Some Interior Pics Of Bel Air’s 60,000 Square Foot Chateau des Fleurs Mega Mansion!

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There are finally some interior pics available of the newly built 60,000 square foot “Chateau des Fleurs” mega mansion located in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles, CA. The home was designed by architect William Hefner and built by Finton Construction (construction started in 2008). It is now one of the largest homes in the country. Of the 60,000 square feet, only about 40,000 is considered habitable by the city. The remaining third consists of underground parking and storage space. It includes 3 elevators, a ballroom, pool, paddle tennis court pavilion, a guardhouse and a guesthouse.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHER’S POST ON THE HOME

  • Daniel

    The exterior doesn’t feel as special as the interior. It’s too symmetrical and the layout doesn’t look right. I’m pleasantly surprised by the interior. I’m glad it isn’t completely covered in gold and marble. I get a 1920s vibe from the interior, something like La Fiorentina. I’m glad they restrained themselves with the millwork. The rooms look livable and the scale isn’t ridiculous. I’m curious what sort of furnishings will fill the rooms. Hope to see more pictures.




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    • Cole

      I completely agree, Daniel. I feel like I’m supposed to hate it because of that exterior, but the interior is just so pretty! That powder blue in picture 7 is spectacular, and the view down the hallway in picture 4 just feels so architecturally perfect. Not to mention, the ballroom is downright epic! The proportions all feel good. I really hope the rest of the house can live up to this.




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  • Brian

    I’m with Daniel. The interior is very credible, with proper scale and well thought out detailing. The exterior, though, really does not work. Like most modern architects, they don’t know how to handle the basic mass of the exterior, which is institutional/hotel-like and boring. The wings overpower the already-weak central block. An unequivocal fail. Horace Trumbauer is rolling over in his crypt somewhere.




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    • Marko

      Is there somewhere that one can learn how to handle mass? If there is, where?

      What do you think of the roof in terms of it only being a “decorative band” with fake dormers and its inappropriate size for a house of this type?

      It’s odd, your comment about the wings suffocating the weak central block. It is so true when you look at that ground-level picture. But when seen from the air, the central block is so fat and massive and flat, that the wings look akward and thin in size, especially when one looks at the house from a point above the Beny Alagem’s house and towards the courtyard. Maybe the entrance is missing a nice avant-corps with a portico or something.

      It is surprising that such a house comes from a hand of someone who studied history of art, and who then went on to pursue a master’s degree in architecture.




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      • Brian

        Marko,

        Architectural schools teach design in all aspects, which includes overall massing. The problem is, they don’t teach it regarding this type of style. This is Beaux-Arts architecture, which was primarily taught in Paris and at some American universities which copied the process. But it isn’t really taught anywhere now, which means an architect would have to be either exceptionally talented or study seriously on their own. This is why there are a number of architects who can design modern mansions well, but only a few who can do classical ones, like this (failure) here.




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        • Marko

          What about the School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame? DO they teach the principles of classical architecture? Are they the only school in the U. S. offering degrees in classical-architecture studies?

          Are there any contemporary architects who you’d say manage to successfully design houses in one of the classical styles? Perhaps Richardson Robertson III or Oliver Pope?




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          • Marko

            Oliver Cope, obviously.




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  • The Dilettante

    How very disappointing. Not that I had high expectations to begin with…




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  • horselips

    I love the symmetry, anything else on this scale would look like a tacked-on afterthought to whatever the main portion was. I like the great wings enclosing the courtyard. I see several very ordinary, unremarkable rooms, the only monumental effort is Pic #8, and only because of the room’s beautiful chandeliers.

    Dilettante is right, perhaps for different reasons than mine. For a building that qualifies more as a bona fide palace than merely a mega mansion, I am nonplussed by the lack of imagination and effort in both the design and execution of the interior. I can only hope they’re saving the knockout rooms for last. Maybe they’ll be impressive.

    On the upside, at least it’s not done in “modern” or “contemporary” décor. Heaven forbid.




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    • Marko

      Is the last line irony or are you serious?




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      • horselips

        Serious. I loathe contemporary décor. I find it sterile, cold-blooded and dispassionate. The tyranny of form following function is fine for cars, boats and airplanes, but not for homes. Elegance and grandeur are visual, not operational. Less is not more, and the plain, the flat, the unadorned, belong in factories and hospitals. In homes, I prefer to see exquisite craftsmanship lavished on stone, wood, metals, fabrics and glass.

        When form follows function, you get Glocks. When form and function are considered equally, you get Lugers and 1911s.




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  • Marko

    Now someone needs to find the pics of the Singaporean Château de la Lumière, designed by Richard Manion.




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  • Marko

    How much uninhabitable space does The Manor have?




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  • Mak

    I think it suffers from a lack of a proper roof.




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    • Brian

      Mak,

      Problems with the roof may be due to LA height restriction. Can’t blame this one on the architect. Build in LA and you are forced into inelegant compromises, at least in this type of mansion.




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      • Mak

        Thanks for the clarification as to why…

        On the other hand, why design something which needs to be compromised so much to make it work? Why not just design something that looks right?




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  • Derek2

    Here is what I get when I click on the link. Any one else getting this?

    Not Found, Error 404

    The page you are looking for no longer exists. Perhaps you can return back to the site’s homepage and see if you can find what you are looking for.




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  • tay

    I drove by this place 2 weeks ago. It looked pretty much finished on the exterior from what I could see, (which isn’t much because it’s up off the road.) There were still hints of construction work though.




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  • dillon

    http://avdmansions.blogspot.com/2014/08/some-interior-pictures-of-bel-airs.html

    Heres another link with images, doesn’t look like 60k square feet rooms seem to be correctly portions…not to huge




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    • Kenny Forder

      All that website does is copy my posts lol




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