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7 Comments

  1. 1

    Andrew

    This home illustrates neatly how I like my staircases: tucked away to the side, taking as much room as it needs to take and no more, relegated to the role staircase is supposed to serve – connecting two levels, not making some sort of grandiose (or ridiculous, in my view) statement.

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  2. 2

    horselips

    testing

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  3. 3

    horselips

    Beautiful home, top quality materials, fine craftsmanship, tastefully decorated and furnished. My only issue is the floor plan – I don’t like the dining room being part of the foyer. The foyer in this plan is very small. With 12,353 sq. ft. and over $7 million to play with, every major public room should be a masterpiece of design, with its own character, its own view, access to the outdoors, and so forth. Sweating the details is why architects make the big bucks. Dinner guests shouldn’t be dining in the freaking entry hall, right next to the front door.

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    1. 3.1

      Luke

      ‘Sweating the details is why [some] architects [might] make the big bucks.’

      FTFY.

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  4. 4

    Luke

    This is, overall, a really nice home (at least to me). The interior could use a bit more colour (there is a bit too much ‘cream’ for my liking), the curtains in #11 need to go, #12 just says old-folks home or 90’s reno in my opinion and the rear of the home per the last two photos is a tad cookie-cutter. Generally, though, the interior has an appropriate amount of details, the rooms are well-sized, the patio is tasteful and has a lovely view and, as Andrew said, I love how they’ve tucked the staircase into the corner and not made it an egregious and ostentatious waste of foyer space.

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  5. 5

    horselips

    Annoyed with the ostentatious waste of space? You’re kidding me. Mansions are all about the ostentatious display of wealth, power and influence.
    The ostentatious waste of space is a perk of high status done for the same reason a dog licks his balls – because he can. And odds are, you can’t.

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    1. 5.1

      Andrew

      That’s a very old school approach though, and certainly not the only one possible. Take Steve Jobs for example – he lived for some 10 years in a relatively modest 14-17,000 sq ft (depending on source) mansion, then had it torn down and submitted plans for a new residence… of 4,900sq ft! (source: http://gizmodo.com/5649909/the-house-that-steve-jobs-will-build) He didn’t need to show off his wealth, power or influence, of which he had, I’m sure, more than you and me and all other readers of this blog combined.

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