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12 Comments

  1. 1

    Daniel

    Great property, love the exterior on the main house, and the classic cars including the Duesenbergs are wonderful.

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      Bill_in_NY

      The gray in the rear, hiding behind the column….is that a Cord?

      Reply
      1. 1.1.1

        Daniel

        Hmm. I’m not certain. At first I thought it was this Duesenberg:

        http://www.rmauctions.com/lots/lot.cfm?lot_id=132087

        Perhaps it’s a Packard?

        Reply
      2. 1.1.2

        Grrrowler

        That is a 1937 Duesenberg SJ, the Bauer Duesenberg (a.k.a. “the last Duesenberg). So Daniel, you were right on your first guess.

        Reply
        1. 1.1.2.1

          Bill_in_NY

          Thank you, G….that darned radiator grille threw me for a loop.

          Reply
  2. 2

    Sam

    The 50,000 square foot mark is where things usually start to go overboard and just look gaudy and tacky. Look at the Spelling/Ecclestone mansion (which I really like BTW after Petra Ecclestone remodeled it), the hideous 50 Cent mansion in Connecticut, David Siegel’s tacky “Versailles”, Donald Trump’s oversized Palm Beach mega mansion now owned by Dmitry Rybolovlev and many more. Now I know that this house is only 40,000 square feet but with the guest house I think I would put this home in the same ballpark as the ones I listed above.

    With that said, this house for some reason looks really “normal” for over 60,000 square feet. The front facade I would even go so far as to say it looks modest. They even got the double staircase to look classy and not over the top. I think it’s because they carefully selected their materials when designing this place. Notice how there isn’t any overly shiny stone or stupid gold leafing to make it look instantly tacky. This kind of house will not look outdated even 50 years after it’s built and hopefully longer.

    My only complaints about this house are that the guest house is kind of ugly and if I were to buy this home I probably would prefer if the guest house was just gone. Who needs a 25,000 square foot guest house anyway? Also the ceilings in the main house seem so low for some reason. You would think that with a house this size you would build it with at least 10′-12′ ceilings. The interior design is a little too old money for me but that could be easily fixed. Oh and good luck moving cars around in that garage without smashing into a pole or two.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Otessa Regina Compton

    The location is ultimate. I like the choice of wallpaper and furniture. The garage area could be a car museum, it does look like it got off to a great start.

    Reply
  4. 4

    Venom

    My God this is one hell of a property. The land, the setting, damn. You could update it somewhat inside, definitely rip that awful staircase out, but that is a trophy property lot if there was ever one. And the Duesenbergs, damn, I would demand they come with the property.

    Reply
  5. 5

    Grrrowler

    The exterior is beautiful. The main house belie its size when viewed from ground level, which is a good thing. The interior is not overly exciting, and I particularly hate the horseshoe staircase. But, that could all be fixed. The setting is simply beautiful. As has already said, the Duesenbergs are stunning.

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Sam

      I don’t understand why it seems like everyone on this site hates double staircases of any kind. I just don’t get it, I think it looks nice (when done right). What is the problem with this staircase?

      Reply
      1. 5.1.1

        Bill_in_NY

        I don’t hate them, but I do see them as a redundancy. Who has 20 guests needing to go upstairs (or down) all at the same exact moment?

        Reply
      2. 5.1.2

        Grrrowler

        Personal preference. I find them generally unattractive and not at all impressive. I think a well-designed single staircase can have a much bigger visual impact than a horseshoe design. A double staircase design seems to serve no other purpose than to impress people. It doesn’t add any functionality, unless the homeowner is incapable of walking the 20′ from one side of the foyer to the other. If that’s the case, the homeowner probably shouldn’t be using the stairs anyway. If homeowners want to awe their guests and the Domino’s delivery guy with two massive staircases, more power to them, but that would be my goal when designing a foyer. On top of all of that, they’ve become trite. When they’re installed in so many new-builds, the effect is not “WOW!”, it’s “Ho hum…another double staircase.”

        Reply

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