Location: Lucca, Italy

Square Footage: 22,604

Bedrooms & Bathrooms: 11 bedrooms & 9 bathrooms

Price: Available Upon Request

This historic 16th Century mansion/villa is located in Lucca, Italy. It was transformed by the architect Oddi in the first half of the 17th century and later re-transformed in the 18th century by the architect Giusti. It features approximately 22,064 square feet of living space on 4 floors. The above ground lower level/basement features kitchen, a lounge and more. The raised 1st floor features the formal reception rooms. The 2nd floor features 8 bedrooms and 6 bathrooms. The 3rd floor features 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. The grounds feature formal gardens, stables and a farmhouse.

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  • Daniel

    So decadent, so gorgeous.




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  • Grrrowler

    That is simply amazing.

    The kitchen needs a little updating.




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  • Sam

    I have a feeling that if this was in America you guys would not be calling it “decadent”. I would guess words like “over-the-top” or “gaudy” would be used. This would be hideous as a house, just because it’s old doesn’t mean it’s good. It would be better suited as a museum. I just find it interesting that any house in America is either “too much” or “too gaudy”, when there are ugly places like this that are somehow “gorgeous”.




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    • Teddi

      You know what? I don’t mind that Versailles or The Winter Palace are gaudy or over the top. I ‘d thought I was okay with it because of the time period and what they were built to do. But seeing this ‘home’ I realize that that’s only part of the equation. The other part being neither of those places are being used as private residences. Ditto with Biltmore. Unless a European count or marquis with ancient bloodlines was going to live here it’s a no from me. I think in this case context is everything. A showhouse or part time museum to showcase the craftsmanship of centuries past, then it works. Just as Highclere works.




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  • opinionfree

    If not now, in the very near future a copy of this home will be created somewhere in the USA (I’d guess California or Florida). When it is, I’ll happily lead the pitchfork parade against it.
    As it stands now, it is still a piece of art. As such, it demands respect. This home is an original, not a mass produced consumable. Yes, it can be assessed as just an old house, it is just bricks and frescoes. However, it has endured a few centuries of survival and is an historical example of a period in time. All may be silly reasons, but it’s an appreciation of art and history that makes us human.
    As Sam pointed out, this should be a museum. I personally feel the Growler is being a pinch critical of the kitchen (with love). Being that it has survived in tact (relative to age) I pray for a comprehensive restoration. I can’t imagine anyone living in there but who knows.




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