This 67,000 square foot mega mansion is located at 13-16 Carlton House Terrace in London, England. It is comprised of 4 interconnected, 6-story white stucco Georgian houses. It is owned by the Hinduja brothers, who control the Hinduja Group, a multinational conglomerate with interests in oil, automobiles, banking, real estate and media. They are worth an estimated combined $8 billion! The brothers purchased the property back in 2006 for $95 million (for a 125-year lease) and then spent another $95 million renovating the entire thing!! It features 25 bedrooms, 6 formal reception rooms, two dining rooms, vast hallways, red-carpeted grand staircase, gym, 12-seat home theater, indoor swimming pool and a penthouse apartment on the top floor. The brothers also own a 25,000 square foot property across the street from this one. A nearby home recently came on the market for $400 million, meaning the brothers’ home might just be worth a staggering $500 million!

*Thanks to HOTR reader Justin for the tip!

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  • Victor

    Wait, just to get this right, I am sorry if this may seem like a stupid question to some of you guys, are you telling me that they do not actually own this house. Yes they do have a 125 year old lease, but I was thinking that if you are going to sink another 95 million dollars into a house it would be a nice thing to pass down through the family.
    In regards to the house, it just feels like an Embassy to me, but oh well




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    • Grrrowler

      I’m afraid you have it right. It’s called a leasehold, as opposed to a freehold, and it is a very long-term lease. Here’s a very wordy explanation: http://www.mypropertyguide.co.uk/articles/display/10106/what-is-the-difference-between-leasehold-and-freehold.htm

      I completely agree with your assessment that this feels like an embassy; that was the first thing that came to my mind. There are some lovely spaces, but others aren’t so lovely. The hallway is beautiful, but the dining hall that is obviously two rooms combined looks like…well, two rooms poorly combined. The chairs monogrammed with brothers’ last initial is a particularly tacky touch. I know we didn’t see any private spaces, which may be elegant and homey (doubt it), but the house seems to exist solely to impress people.




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  • Barney

    The inmates are running the asylum. This is ETERNALLY preposterous and gives the term “wretched excess” such a psychotic new definition so as to make it BEYOND worthless. These people who price these properties might as well list them at NINE-HUNDRED-NINETY-NINE-OCTILLION-KABILLION-KRAJILLION-DOLLARS. I have infinitely more respect and admiration for someone who’s trying to sell a spotlessly & authentically renovated little 1920’s bungalow worth, maybe, 100,000 and getting more than asking for it here in Michigan than I ever would with such incomprehensible monstrosities as these.




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  • Daniel

    Some remarkable spaces in here. That hallway is incredible, though it’s taken a turn towards Middle Eastern inspired.




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  • opinionfree

    I don’t really care about the lease aspect. Since I really hope, not to still be kicking it, when I’m 175 y/o. The fantasy of passing a home through multiple generations is lovely, but seems highly unlikely in these days of immediate gratification and turning a quick pound.
    The interior is too crisp and new looking, no history. Not that some inner city thugs should get all up in there with spray paint, but it has a forced looking formality. If you can afford to live in a home of this caliber, either use real antiques or tone it down and let the house speak for itself. A thoroughbred doesn’t need to wear louboutins. Because, it is in fact a thoroughbred.




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