(pics by Mark Singer Photography)

Location: 1 Buggy Whip Drive, Rolling Hills, CA

Square Footage: 50,000

Bedrooms & Bathrooms: 9 bedrooms & 25 bathrooms

Price: $53,000,000

This jawdropping mega mansion is located at 1 Buggy Whip Drive in a guard-gated community in Rolling Hills, CA and is situated on a little over 7 landscaped acres. Dubbed Hacienda de la Paz, it was buil tin 2001 and features approximately 50,000 square feet of living space, with most of that being underground (there are FIVE subterranean floors). It is owned John Z. Blazevich, chief executive of shrimp importer Viva Food Group.

It features a tree-lined driveway that leads to an impressive limestone motor court. There is a main house, guest house and an apartment/garage wing.

Inside features 9 bedrooms, 25 bathrooms, formal living and dining rooms, library, gourmet kitchen, ballroom that can hold 350 people, orchestra and full catering facilities, awesome indoor tennis court to US Open specifications, underground Moroccan-style baths, billiards room with wet bar, elaborate indoor swimming pool and more. Outdoor features include a swimming pool, rose garden, orchards, marble fountains, bocce court, outdoor clay tennis court to French Open specifications and more.

*Thanks to HOTR reader Jeff for the tip!

CLICK HERE FOR THE ARTICLE ON THE HOME

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HOMES OF THE RICH POPULAR TOPICS
  • Grrrowler

    If someone wants to build a huge house, why build it in a community that allows only single-story houses? If you have to go WAY underground to get the size house you want while following the rules, you’re in the wrong place.

    The exterior of the house isn’t bad. It’s nothing special, but it’s not bad. The interior is another matter. Even the aboveground rooms that don’t feel like they’re in a cave are…well, they’re terrible; the decor is consistently atrocious. The master bedroom has to be one of the ugliest rooms I’ve seen in a long time, in any house of any size. The underground rooms must be even darker in person than in the pics. The double-height indoor tennis court is the only room that I like, but it should be a swimming pool, not a tennis court. The actual indoor swimming pool isn’t bad either.

    The area it’s in is not what I would choose if I were going to spend $53 million. Then again, there’s a very slim chance this will sell for anywhere near that price.




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    • Andrew

      Why? Well, maybe they just liked the idea of creating a large house with relatively small outside footprint… I don’t love *this* house, but I find the idea appealing myself. Dunno why, but living in a cave appeals to me for some reason 🙂




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      • Eric

        Agreed.

        I have always been a fan of basements and building down and not up. The “Concept” of a huge house where 3/4th of it’s space is underground is quite appealing to me, but THIS house is not at ALL what I would have in mind.

        Grrrowler did a fairly good job already of addressing those aspect which instill the “YRCH!” factor for me 😛 But a few things I will add…
        For a house of over 50,000sq ft, we seem to get precious few pictures of the interior. It is very hard to get any sort of sense of flow to the house, or any layout. THIS is a house where printing a floorplan to the place would have been IDEAL if you are trying to sell it. But sadly that is not the case.

        For me the most likable room in the pics is pic 6, the Library/Study room, but that is only because I am a fan of rich dark wood interiors. As for the rest, ESPECIALLY those horrific bedrooms. Well all I can say is it all seems a waste of a lot of pricey resources on something monumentally tacky.




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      • Grrrowler

        I can totally identify with the appeal of a house in a cave. But, I’d want it to be a real cave or cavern of some type, not just a series of square rooms that happen to be below ground.




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  • Wanker

    Wasn’t Caddy Shack filmed at Rolling Hills Country Club ? I hear that place is loaded with gophers !!!!!




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  • Daniel

    Pointless. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a really nice, gigantic tomb, but why would I want to live in a tomb when I am alive? And I really hate how this is $1 million more than what Howard Stern paid for his newly acquired (and stunning) Palm Beach estate:

    http://media.cmgdigital.com/shared/lt/lt_cache/thumbnail/908/img/photos/2013/05/15/93/df/602-N-County-by-Brian-Lee.jpg




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  • Scott

    Everyone knows a ballroom needs to be able to hold at least 400 people.




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  • Larry

    Above or below ground, this is one great house. It should have at least 12 SD501s for the good health of the owner and those taking care of it. Have to agree with comment of pic 6 and brings back memories of going to the Hurst Castle. Iam currious of what the move up might be.




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  • Teddi

    I’m going to have to disagree with Grrrowler on some things, and agree with Eric for once on this point. THIS is a house that NEEDS the floorplan. Come on! 50k sf and a total of 6 floors, you can’t tell me there ISN’T one done just for house guests to prevent them having to leave a trail of breadcrumbs around the house.

    I don’t find the same issue with the decor Grrrowler has. I’ve already made my views known about Spanish colonial, so I’ll just not bother to comment on the exterior, but I thought inside was surprising, not abhorrently so. Though I was not expecting the Moroccan theme at all.

    I’ve seen MUCH more appalling bedrooms than that one. Actually, we’ve seen much more appalling decor right here at least once per week. This seemed much better than most. I think I’d take this over the woolly mammoth and psychedelic pink playroom. None of this is my style, and I don’t really like the idea of so much of everything being underground, but there’ve been mansions you couldn’t pay me to stay in, this isn’t one of them.

    I COMPLETELY agree with the building it somewhere else. My first thought wasn’t why there because of restrictions, maybe if you’re an equestrian nut, that’s the place to call home and have bragging rights. My thought was about the structural support system all the way down there should an earthquake hit.

    I don’t know this area of Cali, so I don’t know if earthquakes are just a rarity or an impossibility. But if it’s possible, once you’ve been through a few, the last place you want to be is anywhere remotely near where one is even possible and be underground for most of the day. If this were in tornado alley, this might be the way to go. But I don’t want to be 5 floors down and have even a small temblor hit. Can’t use elevators and that’s a lot of stairs to sprint up.

    Call me a wuss, but I’m not having my primary residence on any large, Mother Nature-made body of water; I’m not building ANYTHING near an active volcano, and I wouldn’t spend $58M on a house with 5 underground levels in a state that had a 4.8 earthquake less than a month ago. I don’t tempt fate.




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