From my friend Mike Frilund (came up with the inspired estate),

The Goldwood House (whoever purchases it can name it whatever they want) estate is in exterior inspired by Lynnewood Hall in Elkins Park, PA. Originally ment to be an elite cottage in one of the elite villages on the Rublevo-Uspenskoe schosse. The design is now available in any country.

All 3D images are made by RGBvision in Moscow, Russia. They are the artist’s vision of the estate, the real design will be made by Robert Adam and John Henry. Interiors and some furniture by David Linley. If built, with the high level of luxury the architects and designers are planning, this will become the world’s fínest new construction mansion.

Combining Gilded Age luxury with 21st Century technologies, the estate will offer a very exclusive living environment. Over 40,000 sq ft of main building space, and a two-level basement can be added, which will take it to well over 60,000 sq ft. The ground floor (this is first floor to you I believe) features magnificent reception rooms, the grandest is a two-story ballroom. One design idea is a suite of rooms called “The Rooms of the Four seasons”. Interiors and all furniture are inspired by a season, but this idea might not be added in the final design, it depends on client taste. 10,000 + bottle wine cellar with champagne cooling tubs, Finnish luxury sauna, steam baths, grand indoor and outdoor swimming pools. Advanced security systems are offered.

There can be as many buildings as you want on the grounds, but we planned for the main building, two wings (one garage and one guest house), gate house/security, a pool house and a tennis pavilion.

The new owners can have an ulra-exclusive 300′ yacht, superfast sportsyacht, armoured limousine and a totally unique Koenigsegg hypercar designed for them. The hypercar will be a one-off model.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION 

CLICK HERE FOR AN ARTICLE 

  • Daniel

    A lovely concept, but the rear of the home looks too much like a prison in my opinion. Wouldn’t mind that Koenigsegg though…




    0



    0
  • Grrrowler

    Surely the cost of a 300′ yacht isn’t included in the price. If it is, I wouldn’t want it; any quality 300′ yacht would cost more than $100 million on its own. A huge house and a yacht for one price are probably both low quality.

    The house looks like a bank set in a park. I would take the Linley furniture and the Koenigsegg and forget the house.




    0



    0
  • LE

    I was viewing the photos before I read the article and my first thought was that someone had purchased Lynnewood Hall and was planning to fix it up and make it livable again. For those that have not seen, or even heard of Lynnewood Hall, the renderings look very much like the estate itself in PA, even the back portion which I agree is never very attractive. I would hope that anyone looking to live in a house of this scale would consider purchasing Lynnewood Hall instead of building another one because this mansion is doomed for demolition if the current owner can’t get the variance he is looking for or maybe decides to sell it off. Lynnewood Hall is just too significant from an architectural landmark point of view to watch it die a slow and miserable death.




    0



    0
    • Grrrowler

      The article also mentions Whitemarsh Hall. Sadly it’s too late for Whitemarsh, but I hope someone does decide to save Lynnewood Hall.




      0



      0
    • Andrew

      I’m surprised that the designer chose to base the house on a pre-remodel Lynnewood Hall (before they added the porte-cochere and glazed the side porches) as opposed to the mansion in its current form–at least they did their research?




      0



      0
      • Chris

        Lynnewood Hall is a masterpiece. In my opinion, its one of the grandest mansions ever built. I like that a Russian firm is basing a design off of it, however, I’d love if someone were to purchase and restore the original in Pennsylvania.




        0



        0
  • rob

    I wouldn’t trust a Russian firm with a 100 million dollar check. I can see this getting half finished and the firm just disappearing with your money. Something pretty shady here.




    0



    0
    • RGBvision

      Do you know how to read? Who said that the firm is Russian? Russian firm did only renders.




      0



      0
  • Tony

    Hey Kenny I heard of this house already. Didn’t you already do a post on this before? Or did I see it on Realestalker?




    0



    0
    • Kenny Forder

      A reader of the blog came up with the idea for the home, but I never posted about it before.




      0



      0
      • Tony

        Thanks for replying to my question Kenny. Also check out the Forbes article I posted in the below post if you have a moment. It gives a lot of details on the house and some of the details were different at the time of the Forbes article. It seems like they scaled back the size of the house and I think they changed the architect as well.




        0



        0
  • Tony

    Also I remember when I heard about this house before that it was supposed to be 107,000 square feet, not 60,000 square feet. Also the architect for the home was supposed to be William Hablinski of William Hablinski Architecture. Check out this Forbes article from 2011 that talks about the house. This article gives different info. Sounds like maybe they are having issues getting this house built.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/morganbrennan/2011/11/07/the-100-million-homes-for-sale-that-you-have-yet-to-meet/




    0



    0
  • marc22

    ughh this should not be built. Like another post mentioned, if you want a cheap knock-off build this. If you want the real deal spend your money and restore an architectural landmark Lynnewood Hall itself. This will never match the materials and quality of the original so just drop this idea.




    0



    0
    • Chance

      I’ve never understood this sentiment. Lynnewood Hall (or any other “architectural landmark”) is just a building. It’s building materials are still available and readily used if you’re willing to pay for them, it’s not like it was built from a meteorite.




      0



      0
      • Andrew

        Well technically they are replaceable, but in practice houses like Lynnewood Hall will probably never be built again. For example, consider the expense: it cost $8 million to build in the early 1900s which is equivalent to over $200 million today–very few people have that kind of money today, and even fewer would be willing to spend it to build a house, especially one that would require dozens of staff to run and therefore be extremely costly to maintain; moreover, since labor costs were so much lower back then, replicating the craftsmanship seen in Lynnewood Hall would probably mean that it would realistically cost much more than $200 million to reproduce today.




        0



        0
  • dan

    Sounds like an eastern european scam to me. Any billionaire plunking down the dough for that thing deserves to loose it.




    0



    0
    • notUS

      Please fat dumb mccrap fed US citizens stop commenting about geographic areas they can not even indicate on the map.




      0



      0
      • Chance

        You sound just as stupid as those you mock.




        0



        0
  • Sarah van Orten

    It is quite easy to understand that the square footage mentioned in Kenny Forder’s article is for the main building alone. Other buildings included can take the total sq ft up towards 100,000. And it clearly says that the owners can have a yacht designed, says nothing about being included in the price!




    0



    0
    • Tony

      It should be quite easy for you to understand that the original plans called for a main house that was 107,000 square feet just for the main house alone and now the main house is supposed to be only 40,000 square feet if you don’t included the basement area. It is quite easy to understand that that is a huge difference.




      0



      0
  • Sarah van Orten

    I asked about it, and it was ment to be 107,000 sq ft for all buildings included




    0



    0
    • Tony

      I guess I’ll just have to take your word on that cause the Forbes article implies that the main house alone is 107,000 square feet. I didn’t see anything in the article about outbuildings making up part of the 107,000 sq ft total. Who did you ask about this? Are you affiliated with the developer of the house?




      0



      0
  • Chicago

    Ok, what the hell is this? This sounds super shady.
    They write things like “Is IN exterior” and “ment” and also suggest custom designing a car, yacht, or hypercar.
    Did a 6th grader write this? God damn it’s bad.




    0



    0
  • Sarah van Orten

    We must all be happy that Chicago speaks perfect English, because not everyone does, and not everyone is born in an English-speaking country.

    I asked the guys behing the project, and they said that the 107,000 sq ft was for six total buildings. And the yachts and cars are optional and not included in the price at all




    0



    0
    • Tony

      I could be wrong but I get the feeling that you either are the developer or you are somehow affiliated with the developer because you seem to be defending them and you seem to be able to get in contact with them.




      0



      0
  • David Bell

    If they can’t hand draw the house, how can they properly construct it? This house is hand made, with hand made fittings. Forgive me, but why not restore the original house and be a blessing to Cheltenham Township, and the City of Philadelphia? Everything is there to restore, and the culled out pieces can be lovingly hand made by the proper craftsmen.
    And why bother with the CAD fake drawing when there are original photographs of the house and gardens. These photographs are far more impressive than a micanical drawing. Also, why not just get blue brings of the floor plans from the Philadelphia Free Library? What’s with the fakeness and copying?
    Also, Lindwood Hall has Greco-Roman proportional curvatures in the walls. You can’t see them unless you eyeball the elevation from any corner, but these sutle curves in the stonework (hand carved) stonework give the proportional lightness to the house from a distance. Now let me guess……..you won’t bother to reproduce this because no one will see it.
    I think you foolish to copy something that is in despite need of someone to actually love something and therefore restore it. But no, “they” just want to impress people. Nothing turns people off more than the phony gestures in this world. If your client restores this magnificent pile, think of the local work it will insure, the world wide attention it will bring. Even the National Gallery where all the entire Widner Art Collection is, would surely get involved and help you…..maybe even extent a hand or even allow one day to house the Widner Collection on a loan agreement. Now, tell me, is building something fake and copied, and I bet really tacky, and because it’s a phony, will be constantly be made fun of and ridiculed as a fake.
    Sincerely,
    David Bell
    Art Historian and Decorative Painter, dbceilingart@gmail.com




    0



    0