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19 Comments

  1. 1

    Tony

    Hey my comment is first!

    Reply
  2. 2

    Tony

    Eww, what’s that giant naked man behind the couch in the living room. Is that something painted on the wall or what? That’s a hot ass stank ass mess!

    Reply
    1. 2.1

      ted

      it is quite hideous. but saying the phrase “hot ass stank ass mess” is just as bad.

      Reply
  3. 3

    Daniel

    Take away the eclectic artwork collection and you have a very typical though very nice Hamptons interior. Same goes for the exterior.

    Reply
  4. 4

    Grrrowler

    It looks very Hampton-y, which isn’t a bad thing. I’m not overly fond of the two lighthouses stuck on the back, but otherwise it’s nice enough on the outside. The inside has some OK spaces but it’s still somehow boring. I appreciate that there’s art, in at least a few of the rooms, but many of the rooms feel neglected. A lot of the furniture itself has a grandma vibe to it (like the side chairs in pic 6, and everything in pic 5), and when you take away the interesting art there’s not much going on. There aren’t many layers in the decor, which is generally OK for a vacation house, but not for a vacation house with this kind of price tag.

    Reply
  5. 5

    WrteStufLA

    Here’s an interesting exercise for anyone interested enough. Use Bing Maps “Birds Eye View” to view this property site. (Insert “Rose Hill Road, Water Mill, NY” into the search box, then follow Rose Hill Road down until it dead-ends into Mecox Bay.) Zooming in, you’ll see this (newish) huge house still under construction. But if you rotate the view, you’ll then see the earlier, much smaller house that the builder apparently tore down.

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      NOVA Ben

      Yeah, you see that a lot on birds eye view since the various angles are all from different times. I recall looking at a particular property where they actually built the new home before tearing the old one down (presumably to live in it while the new place was going up), and the old one’s footprint was literally 5 feet from where the new one was being erected….it looked like some kind of optical illusion.

      Reply
  6. 6

    Tony

    I still can’t get over the giant naked man creeping behind the sofa. He look like Iggy Pop with a hair cut lurking behind the couch waiting to jump out and flash someone. That’s reason enough for me not to buy this house!

    Reply
  7. 7

    lambskin

    $40 mil for a vacation house… I need to get another job! Hate the gravel driveway-pebbles get in and scratch the wooden floors. Its location is pretty but acreage pretty small considering the price. No front yard-just driveway and house. And what would one do with that small island across the bay-Mother in Law suite?

    Reply
    1. 7.1

      Sam

      Lol that would be a terrible thing to do! Put your your mother in law on a tiny island by herself while everyone else is at the main house? Actually that could be a good idea ;)

      Reply
  8. 8

    Hunter

    Is this the Hilfiger estate that was on the show on MTV a few years back?? That naked man statue looks alot like Tommy.

    Reply
  9. 9

    NOVA Ben

    What, one faux lighthouse wasn’t enough?

    This is okay, but the naked guy seriously creeps me out…I don’t know about anyone else, but in the middle of the night, even something as innocuous as a pile of clothes in the corner freaks me out when I see it out of the corner of my eye…can you imagine getting caught off-guard by THAT thing???

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      Grrrowler

      I thought the creepy guy was two-dimensional art hanging on the wall. He’s actually three-dimensional, which makes it 1000 times creepier!

      http://priceypads.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Rajs_121005_1574LRDEV199817curshsrgb.jpeg

      Reply
      1. 9.1.1

        Daniel

        Way too much f-ing detail…

        Reply
  10. 10

    Chris

    Its too Hamptons-y for me. If I was going to have a Hamptons home, I’d build in Greek Revival, or Mid-century modern, not shingle/craftsman/dutch colonial.

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      ZigZagBoom

      I agree, but for those sort of people, it’s all about being rather uniform. Americans pretending they don’t have a class system is the greatest of farces. If I won the lottery, the Hamptons would be the last place on Earth I’d want to buy beach front property…I’d surely make more headway with semi-gentry English or Bobo Europeans. (Mirrors my general experiences in life as it is, anyhow. The last time I had a meaning conversation with complete strangers was an epic 4 hour tour-de-force with a wealthy French couple visiting Barcelona, we met in a tapas bar and talked about topics as diverse as David Lynch, nano-technology, the conceits of anime fandom – yes, before the notorious SNL skits started up, rural Americana, etc. All people in the Hamptons would be talking about would be…well…you get the picture.)

      Reply
  11. 11

    marc22

    Geez get over the crappy art collection. The way everyone is condemning the house based upon the owners art collection is as silly as when a person refuses to buy a house based upon the color of the carpeting or a rug. Pointless criticism. We’re not a 3rd grade class on a field visit to the museum giggling at the naked roman statue with breasts.

    THe house is very Hamptons. The “art” takes a lot to get over but it all goes with the owner when the house is sold, including one naked fellow behind the couch. So the interiors, setting and views are left behind and they are not too shabby but a bit pricey at $40M.

    Reply
  12. 12

    rob

    This just screams pretentious New Yorker in from the city for the weekend showing everybody how sophisticated and modern they are. This is the exact thing that is such a turn off for the Hamptons. It is less about having a good time and more about showing off and being pretentious. Other than that this is a nice enough house. This would be great in Maine.

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      ZigZagBoom

      NO! A charming old Maine beachfront mansion would be great in Maine…not the Hampton-y pretentiousness you so relished attacking!
      You could get those for amazingly low prices back in the late 90s. Some super yuppies in DC – this woman couldn’t stop talking about how quickly she’d ascended the ladder at Ernst & Young – told me about a friend of theirs who worked in Boston buying a gigantic mansion in Maine for a pittance, something like $500,000. It wasn’t on the beach but was near the coast. The place was palatial – what you’d see on this blog for 10-15 million if it were in someplace that “mattered”. That being said I’m sure it rose during the bubble like everything else. I wonder if he flipped it.

      Reply

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