Rosewood Estate is a gorgeous Georgian style masterpiece located at 500 St. Cloud Road in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles, CA. The home was on the market a while ago and then subsequently sold. It is now back on the market. Situated on 1.75 manicured grounds behind wrought iron gates, the estate was designed by renowned architect Richard Manion and completed in 2005. It is based on early 18th-century English Manor homes and exudes timeless elegance. The facade is comprised of handmake brick matched with carved limestone moldings, elaborate chimneys, a rare quartz roof, and double-hung windows. Inside there is over 23,000 square feet of luxurious living space with 9 bedrooms, 20 bathrooms, oval entry hall, massive reception rooms that open to vast terraces, formal and informal dining rooms, formal living room with 12 foot ceilings, oak paneled ballroom with seating for 120 guests, gym, wine cellar with tasting room, underground car museum with attached diner, model train room and more. The grounds feature a guest house, formal lawns, glass tiled swimming pool, outdoor kitchen, several walking paths, treehouse, koi ponds and a tennis court. It is listed at $46,000,000.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Daniel

    I have always loved this home. Exceptional detailing inside and out. I’d say that this is an absolute bargain compared to that five-star Home Depot Mo Hadid has listed for $58 million. More pics here:

    http://www.williamhablinski.com/project-details.php?id=64&p=r




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    • Nic

      I agree – I love this home. If I had one minor complaint, the front entrance is a little too close to the road for my taste. Don’t they get those awful tour buses in their area. Otherwise it is gorgeous.




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    • A

      Of course, out of every home on this site..THIS one is the one that Daniel had nothing bad to say.




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  • Chicago

    Floorplans in Manions book.




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  • Don

    Love this house. One of the only houses you can actually see from the street




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  • Tony

    $46 million for 1.75 acres? Who do they think they are fooling? I could see that price for La Belle Vie which was in the same area and on the same street and similar acreage but La Belle Vie had a larger and much more detailed and oppulent interior to warrant the price.




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    • Nic

      I think a lot of the sellers believe the market is back up (or at least that is what they wish to believe) based on recent unusually high sales by foreign buyers in cities like NY. When you watch shows like Selling LA it is clear that these sellers expect the buyers to pay big bucks for customized areas of their homes that more than likely only appeal to the sellers specific tastes. Example – the 50’s themed room that seems so out of place. In a space like that I would prefer something that resembled an upscale London Pub.




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  • Tony

    I found a house right around the corner from this one at 10372 sunset blvd. The house is only $7.9 million. You could probably negotiate the price down to around $7 million. It is pretty good quality for the price. You could renovate it for probably only $500,000. This home is on 1.3 acres with tennis court and everything. You could buy this home and have it fully renovated for under $8 million total probably. Plus if you want you could tear it down and build a $25 million mega mansion and the total with land and construction costs would still only be around $33 million or less. I think i’d rather do that then spend $46 million on Rosewood.

    Check out the house at this link:

    http://www.10372sunset.com/MLS.html#




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  • Captain Obvious

    uhh…old westbury gardens much?




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  • NOVA Ben

    Oh wow. Gorgeous. I’d take out the blue & gold carpet in that one room and put some nice hardwoods down (if there aren’t already hardwoods under the carpet). Other than that this is wonderful.




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    • lambskin

      Me too. It looks like this room is a ball room for dancing/parties etc-the carpet is ugly and a drag.




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  • Grrrowler

    Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous. Did I mention, gorgeous? I’d gut the ridiculous ’50s themed soda fountain/billiard room but that would be easy enough. The rest of the interior is truly beautiful. As an aside, the decorator’s web site has some other very nice work: http://www.jenniferbevan.com/portfolio.html

    As for the price, I have to say that for a LOT less I’d take the Paul Williams house that Tony linked to even though it’s directly on Sunset. The old-fashioned interior could be corrected with a couple of million dollars, still making it less than 1/4 the price of this place. Although, Iris Cantor’s house just down the street sold for $40 million so maybe there’s hope for for this place at this price.




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    • Tony

      But this house is no where on the level of Iris Cantor’s house and her house still only sold for $40 million, not $46 million. Look at the detail of the foyer of Iris Cantor’s house. The foyer in Rosewood has standard wainscotting you can find online for cheap. Iris Cantor’s foyer has custom carved molding from floor to ceiling and has an intricately detailed domed ceiling. Also in the bathroom of Iris Cantor’s home the walls are custom carved wood and marble from floor to ceiling. We aren’t talking about a plain dry wall looking wall with a little strip of crown molding here and a strip of wainscotting there. We are talking about floor to ceiling woodwork covering the entire walls just like you’d find in a wood panelled custom library. Most houses don’t have the level of detail of La Belle Vie. Iris Cantor’s house is museum quality through out with the detail and quality of the white house or some great estate. Rosewood is ok but some of the rooms are outdated and sorta cheap quality. A few of the rooms are nice quality but Iris Cantor’s house is quality all throughout and La Belle Vie’s interior is timeless so it will never be outdated.

      Look at all the custom carved molding from floor to domed ceiling in the foyer of La Belle Vie:

      http://besthomedesign.org/image/La-Belle-Vie-Estate-%E2%80%93-Lavish-living-8.jpg

      Here’s the bathroom of La Belle Vie:

      http://www.blogcdn.com/www.luxist.com/media/2009/05/abellevie2.jpg




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      • ZigZagBoom

        Your comparisons seem spurious. First of all, these are very different in style. It only makes sense to compare their PRICE as two luxury properties based on location, size, land amount, special very expensive features like indoor pools, etc. I don’t think the interior differences you cite account for much of a price difference. Do you really think the Cantor home was carved by hand or something? What, by french artisans working in rustic farmhouses in Dordogne LOL? Sorry to break it to you, but the right CNC milling machine could have carved everything in that house in a day or so. Granted, one is talking about a day of work from a machine costing several hundred thousand dollars, but NOT enough to account for millions more in build cost at all. A couple hundred thousand more perhaps, once design and install is taken into account. But you ignore, for example, that the Rosewood foyer is curved, so would definitely have required custom millwork anyhow. Nobody bought that at Lowes LOL.
        And yes, it obviously takes some cues from Old Westbury Gardens – good for them – the Phipps had impeccable taste and hired the best Edwardian English architect that money could buy. Of course, it’s not quite as good. The Cantor house seems to mix exterior notes of Palladian and Beaux-Arts with a dash of Rococo…it’s definitely not ugly but the whole effect is less harmonious to me.




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        • John A.

          What’s Palladian and Rococo about La Belle Vie?




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          • ZigZagBoom

            I don’t claim to be an architectural historian but will see no purpose to responding to things like this in the future, I either know my stuff or double-check to be sure. There’s something about that use of a fan (palladian!) window with ornamental greek columns that seems Palladian:
            http://www.worldpropertychannel.com/news-assets/La-Belle-Vie-Bel-Air-Estate-Home-Photo-by-Nick-Springett.jpg

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Palladian_window.jpg

            Rococo? Well, I admit that’s more of a stretch, but the fussy balcony railings are definitely Rococo in style.

            Don’t get me wrong, the Cantor house is more tasteful than most other contemporary SoCal mansions. It’s far better than the revolting Spelling mansion. It just doesn’t come together completely, as an exterior. The scaling isn’t quite right, either – needs to be taller for that look. And no Europeans would have those stupid “facade blocker” bushes planted in front. “Oh look, we can afford people to clip them” LOL.




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        • Tony

          I would assume the moldings in La Belle Vie are hand carved. I can’t be 100 percent sure but I’d assume that based on the detail of the work and the custom appearance and based on the fact that many estates of this stature use custom hand carved moldings. But even though these are two completely different types of homes the quality of La Belle Vie is far superior to Rosewood. Also even though both foyers are domed the detail of La Belle Vie’s dome is superior. Rosewood’s dome is simple and bland. All I am saying is that I’d pay $40 million for the quality that is in La Belle Vie. But I wouldn’t pay $46 million for Rosewood because since it doesn’t have superior quality then it doesn’t really boast anything to warrant the price. Also if it is so cheap to put custom molding and woodwork through out an entire home of this size then why do only so few homes do this? Only La Belle Vie, La Bellevedere, Michael Jackson’s rented Carolwood estate and a few other estates have this. Also Fleur Dy Lys and Champ D’or and a few others have custom woodwork through out most of the estate. And all the houses that have this feature were originally priced at $50 million plus. So having this type of quality obviously does add to the price.




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          • ZigZagBoom

            “So having this type of quality obviously does add to the price.”

            Well, that’s just the success of marketing. Good for them if they can get gullible buyers to pay millions more for something that costs hundreds of thousands more. I applaud their business acumen. I’m not quite willing to bet my life, but I’d be absolutely SHOCKED if that was all carved by hand. It was done using machines like this:
            http://www.wsfinc.com/custom-millwork.php

            There are ultra-luxury appointments that could add MILLIONS to the interior of a house – gold, precious minerals, and very exotic woods for example. There are also ones that very few rich people would have the time to even know about: for example, getting the Minton factory to pop out a few thousand custom made true encaustic tiles for you. But fancy millwork made by machines simply isn’t one of them. A rich friend of mine told me how much his totally custom mahogany library/office was and I was shocked it was so low. It wasn’t as ornate but had some medallions and turned features. It was less than 20K at the height of the RE boom, in an expensive market: Buck Co., PA. Based on that figure I’m still quite comfortable saying the millwork in any of the places you mention could not have been more than a few hundred thousand.




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        • John L.

          When La Belle Vie was in Architectural Digest, the article mentioned that the details in the staircase railing in the foyer were hand-hammered (as opposed to hand-cast). There may be other references like that in the article. I’m out of town now, but I’ll re-read the article when I return to see if there are other such references.




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  • Brian

    This house is certainly a worthy effort, and somewhat resembles Old Westbury House on Long Island, although not as architecturally noteworthy. But the roof pitch is way too shallow and consequently the dormers look squashed. I would have to knock off at least a few mil for this faux pas.




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    • ZigZagBoom

      Yep, that is one mistake they made, which I’ve cited on previous “mansions” featured here. It’s funny to ask: do these sort of things not occur to the builders/architects, or do they actually try to get away with cutting a few tens of thousands of dollars on a house they are going to charge millions for? Are they actually that cheap?




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      • Grrrowler

        Two words regarding the roof pitch: height restrictions.




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        • ZigZagBoom

          You’re probably right, but that’s a shame. And kind of ridiculous. I drove through a couple of those neighborhoods when I was out there…every house being 8 ft. taller wouldn’t have made a damn bit of difference in how they look. Still a bunch of (mostly hideous) mansions on lots that are quite small for their size.
          Speaking of LA, does anybody know who was building the HUGE mansion visible from the Getty, about 2 years ago? Off to the NW, along the ridge and at the top of a hill? I think I have a picture somewhere.




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    • ZigZagBoom

      When I realized it was not built on spec, I wondered if perhaps the owner mistakenly thought a higher roof line would look bad for some reason. Maybe someone who grew up in California is only used to seeing steeper rooflines on Victorian or faux Gothic buildings. (the Disney Castle LOL) The architect should have offered him (or her) the option of doing it in the regency style, with a low roof being set back somewhat, but requiring the facade to be raised a bit. That would have been a way to keep the owner happy and the architecture sound. It also adds a nice hidden balcony to the top of the house.




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  • marc22

    As has been noted the house tried very hard to mimic Old Westbury House on Long Island. The rear facade is soooooooo similar and the front entry is a close copy but again the home falls short of Old Westbury House in many ways. It is though a very elegant house with some odd design variations but the price is ridiculous.




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  • Amanda

    …I don’t really like it. The roof is much too low, and for a ‘georgian home’ the detailing is either not there or below my expected standards, particularly the ceilings. In fact nothing in the interior particularly stands out, most of the rooms seem comical. The fascade and terrace has a pleasant look, but would definitely look better with a larger roof.




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  • Chris

    The roof is too low and the price is too high. Still a nice house.




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  • DC Scott

    I find it ironic that Los Angeles out of all places (but America in general) builds more authentic English homes than the English do: See any new mansion in England, you will be hard pressed to find anything traditional, warm, regal, or timelessly elegant inside, unlike this beauty. The only thing that is a bit much for me is the blue and gold carpet, but it does go with the house.

    As others have noted the roof should not be flat, but I guess CA and CO insist on no tall houses.

    DC is notorious for having lots of post war crap neighborhoods filled with 50’s split levels and capes, and the new money in Bethesda or NW DC will tear a modest brick split level and build a 4 level box in its place, built as close to the lot lines as possible. The result is a very disjointed neighborhood. I can see why many cities in the Bay Area and So-Cal have height restrictions for that reason of neighborhood preservation, but it looks silly to have a flat roof on such a grandiose house.




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    • ZigZagBoom

      You have a point that there seems to be a certain “boring English McMansion” look in the UK. Here’s my theory though: the members of the upper classes who care about such things are already safely ensconced in their vintage stately homes. There is a constant sort of flux and turnover among them; if you simply wanted to live in an authentic Georgian manor home, for example, your angle would be to marry into a family that owns one, rather than build one! And if you merely have money, a few of them are always coming up for sale: hence DB & Posh Spice (aka, the human/sleestak hybrid) could live here for a while: http://www.bittenandbound.com/2012/03/24/beckhams-list-uk-mansion-for-28-million-photos/
      Thus there’s really no point for the market to churn out copies of what’s already available. The Middle Eastern sheiks won’t know any better; they’ll either buy something historic because it’s historic, or something ugly because an estate agent shows it to them and it costs $10m UKP. OR because someone famous once owned it: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1038989/Prince-Andrews-15million-mansion-left-rot-demolished.html




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  • Dream Mom

    Stunning.




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  • lambskin

    Beautiful house. Would love to see the kitchen. Nice big dining room and living room. There is a a ‘diplomat’ feel about it.




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    • ZigZagBoom

      It does remind me of a couple of the old 1920s mansions in DC, now used for embassies.




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  • andi

    Price seems very high to me. The lot is not exactly huge: seems like the tennis court, pool, and house are all squished together. Also the house looks and is dated and not in a good way. Divide the price by 3 or even 4 and that might seem right to me. I imagine the home will one day be demolished anyway because it’s just not that special in any regard. I’m not uber wealthy, but if I was I would want something that wasn’t so dated looking. The good thing going for the place is the absence of BEIGE!




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  • ZigZagBoom

    “The lot is not exactly huge: seems like the tennis court, pool, and house are all squished together. ”
    95% of the lots in that area are like that. Newsflash: land is expensive in coastal Southern California. Unlike, say, the Hamptons, it’s just not practical for everyone to dig a well supplying hundreds of gallons a day and putting in a septic field so that houses can be spread far apart. There’s not that much ground water to draw.
    The White House is “dated” looking, but it hasn’t stopped people from wanting to live there. Nor are they about to tear it down. I guess the Spelling Mansion is more your “style”.




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