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32 Comments

  1. 1

    Jeff

    You left out the 2 elevators. What did you think of the grounds? Does the patio give a good private view? Can an outdoor pool be built given the rocky yard with the needed privacy? What did you think of the proximity to the street?
    How flexible is the seller?

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      george

      I think they ran out of money so they could not install the elevators.

      Reply
      1. 1.1.1

        ZigZagBoom

        LOL They should have spent less on the inane “landscaping”.

        Reply
  2. 2

    Jeff

    One more thing. There is an addition on the back, (All white siding in the photo), which is not on the floor plans. What is in there? Last time I was there they were just building it onto the otherwise finished house.

    Reply
    1. 2.1

      LGCS

      No real addition to speak of, they enlarged the bow window to teh squared out thing where the staircase and hall under it are

      Reply
  3. 3

    Daniel

    It seems like a lovely home but something tells me you can find an older teardown or empty parcel and build this home for much less than asking. Also, what makes the seller think that the home has appreciated $3 million a year, especially considering they were *asking* $14.5 million and not offered that price.

    Reply
    1. 3.1

      DR.VEGAS

      There are “new money” Russian & Chinese buyers out there who have no idea of the history of the price.I’m sure the hope is that they can get that new number since high-end properties have (allegedly) started to heat up.

      Reply
  4. 4

    Jeff

    The current owner bought it for $12 Mill. It was unfinished inside. He did the interior finishing and added more square footage in the rear. Look at the rear photo and compare it to the floor plans.

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Jeff

      I drove by again this month. I still can’t get over the oddly shaped lot with the home so close to the street. The angle of the driveways gives it the illusion of privacy, as it says in the realtor’s description. Truth is, if any kids play ball on the street, the home is in jeopardy of a few broken windows. Not typical in Greenwich. I’ve noticed that someone is taking advantage of the developing neighborhood and putting up a home across the street! The drapes will have to be drawn at night now for sure.

      Reply
  5. 5

    Grrrowler

    Nice house, but I think the price is too high. Kenny, I appreciate your pics; it’s always nice to see humans in these houses to give a sense of scale. I would, however, suggest getting a better camera for future field trips. :-)

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Kenny Forder

      Yeah, it’s my cellphone camera -_- haha

      Reply
  6. 6

    Tay

    Niiiice.! Did you think the house was a little close to the street Kenny?
    Also, how was Greenwich haha!? Have any time to check out any other areas in town?

    Reply
    1. 6.1

      Kenny Forder

      I was expecting it to be closer to the street. I like the location! I passed by Judge Judy’s house as well as a few mega mansions under construction.

      Reply
    2. 6.2

      Daniel

      Hey Tay, do you know anything about the large home on Dewart Road? It seems like it may be on one of the largest lots in Greenwich. The home has always intrigued me ever since I found it in Birds-Eye view.

      Reply
      1. 6.2.1

        Tay

        yeah same here. It is one of the largest lots in the town, there are a few really old money, undeveloped estates on larger lots in the backcountry though. But I would really like to know who owns it, I think it was passed on from one generation to the next and a whole family trust owns it. I’m pretty sure it’s not a hedge fund or financial titan’s home. I know that it was heavily renovated and expanded(acreage and sf wise) in the early 2000’s, and the house is over 30,00 sf..

        Reply
  7. 7

    Jeff

    Did you check out the mansion on the other side of the pond on Mooreland?

    Reply
  8. 8

    Geoffrey

    I love that they have a room thats marked as a play room / “Trading Floor” ! Who has a trading floor. I mean i have a room that i sit at my computer with a couple of screens to do my trading – but lets be honest, you don’t have your broker around every day and have your friends shouting order instructions at him in your own home…

    haha – love it :)

    Reply
  9. 9

    DR.VEGAS

    Not bad (visually speaking) for a mega-mansion. It certainly fits the “Greenwich vibe”.Plenty of room for a sick gym…and a “man cave” garage for tinkering & auto restoration.The new owner will certainly do something to the effect of expanding the pool options. That lap pool may be functional…but it’s hardly a entertainment feature.That aside…who’s the cutie on your arm,Kenny? What’s her friends’ story…the one in the background? :-) Dude…you got some long arms.Were you ever a pitcher?

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      Kenny Forder

      That’s Laquayva, one of our readers! The on in the background was checking people in. LOL yeah I have long arms -_- Nope, never.

      Reply
  10. 10

    george

    Kenny, how would you rate this head to head with the Stone Mansion of Alpine.

    Reply
  11. 11

    david dempsey

    i think this home would be better if they put darker floors and had some contrast in the kitchen.the stairs and railings also look under done…just sayind and i think that if i had the money i would buy this and fix everything i stated before and more..alot more

    Reply
  12. 12

    Tony

    What I don’t like about this house is that it is only on 9 acres. A house of this scale should be on way more acreage. I’d say maybe 60 or so acres. I would have bought an estate like Mel Gibson’s 75 acre estate in Connecticut and tore it down and built something of this size. Also the interior should be a little bit better quality for all the hype this house had. The interior isn’t that bad but I’d expect this level of quality in a 10,000 square foot to 17,000 square foot home. For 30,000 plus square feet I’d expect more.

    Reply
  13. 13

    ZigZagBoom

    Firstly, I want to thank Kenny for sharing this with us.
    I like a lot of things about this but it’s also tragically flawed by a couple serious mistakes. The architectural detailing is quite nice. BUT, the HUGE garage bump out is completely ridiculous. This is just so obvious to me: if one is making anything from a pastiche to a direct replication of a historical style – and this is definitely more the latter – one must remember that garages became a feature of middle-class tract homes in the 1950s! And an ugly feature at that! So: although at least the doors don’t face forward, the huge forward facing “architectural blob” mars what would otherwise be an elegant, classy facade. I just can’t believe an architect got away with such a harebrained sloppiness. I’ve seen a couple mansions in the UK that go to the length of almost completely concealing the garage on a lower level with an almost invisible, steeply raked access road. I don’t think we need to go that far. (And it wouldn’t be a good idea in a climate with a lot of snow like Connecticut, unless the roadway was heated) But this take garage-itis to a new level of absurdity. it’s got to go behind or to the side of the house…end of discussion, unless you’re doing a contemporary style. This is like “Look! I have so many vehicles that the stable to house them is almost as big as my house!”

    Which brings me to issue 2: they’ve put in a European style forecourt. Fine, that’s good. It’s an improvement over a stingy circle. (One will notice in Downton Abbey that the area in front of Highclere castle could comfortably accommodate the vehicles of 25 visiting dignitaries, should they all arrive at the same time.) BUT they’ve hidden the nice front elevation with a willy-nilly set of trees that block the facade and do nothing to elevate the design. They aren’t even symmetrical, and they look like they will continue to grow much larger. Maybe it’s a strange form of planned obsolescence: “hey guys, eventually these trees will reach 80′ tall and fall over the house, crushing it. Then you’ll have to hire me to rebuilt it!” Those look like they were probably very expensive too, as they must have been quite large when planted. The Japanese maple nearest the door would have been several thousand dollars in that size. Totally wasteful. With 9 acres, there’s plenty of room to put one’s botanical amusements elsewhere.

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      tay

      Look at most of the mansions in Greenwich, and even the Northeast in fact. You will see that there is a style called the Georgian colonial and a lot of them have these features. And you should probably look up this architect’s work too, Boris Baronovich, probably the most known nyc area residential architect with some really nice mansions and penthouses by him.

      Reply
      1. 13.1.1

        Kenny Forder

        He designed the gorgeous Rosewood estate in Chappaqua, NY <3

        Reply
        1. 13.1.1.1

          Tony

          Hey Kenny, if this is supposed to be “couture ready” then how come the interior is completely finished now? Did they change their minds about the whole “couture ready” thing?

          Reply
          1. 13.1.1.1.1

            Kenny Forder

            Well the original owners didn’t want to finish it and wanted to leave that up to the buyer. It was then bought by someone else who finished the home. I mean some rooms are still not finished, but overall it’s mostly complete.

      2. 13.1.2

        ZigZagBoom

        LOL at your non-substantive response. “He’s popular with new money hedge fund managers, so he must have good taste”. As I said – if you’d read what I said – the architectural details and substance are generally excellent. I just think he got an order from the developer for spaces for 8 cars to be parked within the house, and was compelled to do something that looks ridiculous. The fact he knows how to design the rest of it so well makes it that much more glaring. I wouldn’t be surprised to see such garbage on this place:
        http://homesoftherich.net/2012/09/20000-square-foot-newly-built-mega-mansion-in-draper-ut-owned-by-entertainment-mogul/
        I surveyed a number of his other properties in google images and none of them have such an insanely huge garage bump-out.

        OK…as for the landscaping. Here’s a selection of authentic rural Northeastern Georgian colonials, since apparently YOU need reminding:
        http://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/historic/olddutch-wallace/odwh-wallacehouse.htm (no foundation shrubs)
        http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/gov.-john-langdon-house (one miniscule clipped evergreen)
        http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/lyman-estate
        (2 tiny almost invisible shrubs)
        Authentic 19th century Georgian revival, built and owned by old money:
        http://binged.it/TUzQP4
        No “foundation shrubs”. One small tree to the side.

        (as I’ve stated before, it’s fine for large homes in semi-urban settings to have trees near the house – obviously they have to go somewhere. 9 acres is not urban.)

        I do notice that many Greenwich mansions have such risible faux modesty, as if to say, “hey I’m just a regular guy, I live in another suburban tract home just like the little people, it’s just a little bigger, so I’ll landscape like they landscape too.” All that proves is that these people don’t know any better, and/or that the landscape “architects” they hire try to ingeniously cram in as many expensive, large specimen plants as they can so they can ring up a bill in the hundreds of thousands for every pile. Good for them! Their kids need to go to college! Doesn’t mean it isn’t historically inaccurate.

        Reply
        1. 13.1.2.1

          Tay

          I did not read what you said because you were complaining about a garage “bump” and I laughed my way to the response. This is a SPEC HOUSE. A SPEC HOUSE. Spec houses are usually designed around the developers ideas more than the architect, or future owners preferences. AKA the cheap developers and investors were trying to make as much house as they could for not spending the amount that they could have. Then after that, once Antares was wiped out of cash after the financial collapse, someone bought it for cheap and decided to finish it, not with the best landscape choices but guess what? they’re making millions of dollars off it when it sells so who cares? Plus the buyer will rip it all out anyway.

          BTW I live in CT, not far from Greenwich, my neighbors house was built in 1750 and and I have a home in my family built in the 1770s, and I know, there is a huge difference in the appearances of historically accurate designs and what is now called the “Stockbroker Georgian.” But times change and so do people’s wants and needs.

          P.s- Google maps is fun and all, but make your judgments when you’re actually here.

          Reply
          1. 13.1.2.1.1

            ZigZagBoom

            “Spec houses are usually designed around the developers ideas more than the architect, or future owners preferences.”

            And apparently they are bad ones…at least with this front elevation dominating garage.

            “P.s- Google maps is fun and all, but make your judgments when you’re actually here.”
            Yes, yes, I’ve been to enough of these places to know what they are like.

          2. 13.1.2.1.2

            Jeff

            Design is a matter of taste. There is no good or bad designs per se. I guess one of you is an architect or a college student of architecture. Those strict rules are for the classroom only. Not for individual preferences.

  14. 14

    Jeff P.

    I just spent about 30 minutes absorbing that listings page. Wow, wow, wow, WOW! I love this house, the floorplans, and the slideshow on the listing site are to die for, but there are a couple of things I would change. I’m not a fan of the “paint everything white” colonial aesthetic – so I would leave much of the beautiful molding in this home with a dark stained finish. Also, I agree with the others who said this home really needs to sit on a bigger plot. 75 acres at least – gotta have some room for horses. :) Also, a beautiful outdoor pool for entertaining – and take this whole thing out of Greenwich and put it somewhere within 2 hours of Atlanta, and now we’re talking!

    Thanks for the first-person views, Kenny! This one is a real winner!

    Reply

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