This 1932-built home is located at 199 Terrace Lane in Upper Brookville, NY and is situated on 2 acres. It underwent an addition to include an indoor swimming pool and an indoor tennis court, something you rarely see in a home. The listing says it’s 16,000 square feet which I’m guessing is mostly the indoor  tennis court considering there are only 3 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. I personally think indoor tennis courts are a waste. If it was attached to a monster estate then that would be okay. However, in this case, the indoor tennis court is WAY bigger than the actual house! That’s definitely not good when it comes to resale value. The home is listed at $3,469,999.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Grrrowler

    The tennis court would be the first thing to go; I’d much rather have open lawn space than that monstrosity. It’s nice that they tried to blend the tennis pavilion into the style of the house using brick, but it completely overwhelms the house. Aside from the hideous goiter that is the tennis court, the front is really awkward with the offset entry; that just grates on my nerves. The interior is dull as dishwater and needs some major updating. It looks like there are some original details left in it, so at least there’s something to work with. However, I’m not sure it’s worth working with it at this point.




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  • Hugh

    I really like this place. I’m sure I could turn the tennis court into something a bit more useful.




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  • Daniel

    Ugly duckling.




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  • mac22

    Unfortunately the listing is completely wrong. I dont know where people get their information from?

    The “house” was always the exact size that it is today with tennis court and pool. It was once a “playhouse” structure for a very large estate mansion that was located just to the south-east of this sturcture. After the mani home was torn down, someone renovated the “playhouse” into a residence and that is why the home has huge recreational facilities and only a handful of bedrooms. That is also why the finishes might not be as elaborate as one would expect, since this rooms were at one time guest rooms, lounges, changing rooms etc, not formal living spaces.

    The link shows the old estate and includes photos of the playhouse with tennis court and pool back prior to its conversion into a residence. I wish brokers would do some research on the properties they are selling especially with the commission this broker is expecting to get. Obviously its better to make things up then get facts correct.

    http://www.oldlongisland.com/2009/08/when-farlands-was-for-sale.html




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    • Grrrowler

      Good find. That explains a lot, especially the reference to “The Play House” in the listing.




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    • Kenny Forder

      Oh, thanks for the clarifications! 🙂




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      • mac22

        you’re welcome.

        Always a great blog to read!!!!!!




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        • Kenny Forder

          Thanks, I appreciate it! Just wish I was correct on more things =/




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          • NOVA Ben

            You were only sharing information that the broker had incorrect & ambiguous, so you’re not at fault here 😉




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  • ted

    nothing to write home about.




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  • NOVA Ben

    I want to like this because of its historic value, but it’s just so damn…awkward. Mac22’s info explains why it seems awkward, and to me this kind of property will always be compromised when you’re dealing with a structure that wasn’t built to serve the purpose that it eventually came to serve.




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  • ZigZagBoom

    That’s been the fate of many of American’s largest private residences from the Golden Age. The ones you know about still being around – The Breakers, Biltmore, etc. are the exceptional ones that were saved. And the trashing goes on…rumor has it that Carter’s Grove in Williamsburg has been almost destroyed from neglect by corrupt, tax-evading “Internet millionaire” (no more) Halsey Minor.




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    • marc22

      He hasn’t destroyed the house, but it is sadly neglected while he goes through his financial issues and legal problems. He has however destroyed centuries of intact and undiscovered archealogical material by bulldozing away acres of fields which the Williamsburg Foundation had started to explore and document.

      Unfortunately partial blame falls on the Williamsburg Trustees who allowed this historic property to be sold with no restrictions or covenants or oversight agreements. Stupidity has a price. We dont treasure our landmarks and history in this country even one quarter the way they are treated in England, France and elsewhere throughout Europe.




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      • ZigZagBoom

        True, AND they were stupid enough to hold the mortgage…so they won’t even come out ahead financially, which was the whole reason to sell it — at least until they find another buyer. But they are unlikely to find one who will pay the same price Halsey did.




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