The Dorothy Chandler estate belonged to cultural leader and philanthropist Dorothy Buffum Chandler. Her philanthropic efforts led to the construction of the Los Angeles Music Center. The home was built in 1913 and is located at 455 Lorraine Boulevard in Los Angeles, CA. It was designed by renowned architects J. Martyn Haenke & William Dodd in American Beaux Arts style. It features 9,329 square feet of living space with 6 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms and large formal reception rooms. There is also a swimming pool and a detached garage. It is listed at $11,250,000.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Justin

    Don’t know if it’s the style of house (i’m not very knowledgable on all that kind of stuff) but the front facade looks exactly the same as palais de agnes.




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  • Daniel

    Hmmm. This one doesn’t stand out to me. It looks like it was an “opulence on a budget” project.




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    • Barney

      ?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? “Opulence on a budget” regarding an original, 1913 Beaux Arts home built by Master Craftsmen from at least three countries in Europe. Yup, that sure reeks of “budget” doesn’t it??

      Correction, I should absolutely know to expect such a statement from you, Daniel.
      Only a pitiful NINE-THOUSAND-THREE-HUNDRED-AND-TWENTY-NINE-SQUARE-FEET, right?? And where’s the 50 car garage for all your Ferrari’s, Lamborghini’s, Bugatti’s, Deusenberg’s, Mercedes, Lear Jets, etc., etc., etc. ?




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      • Chris

        finally, someone who gets me! Thank god I’m not the only man in love with this residence. Its got something few mansions these days have, class.




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      • Daniel

        Did I mention size anywhere? Sheesh, didn’t expect *that* comment of all comments to strike a nerve.

        And Barney, Lear jets are bargain basement. Challenger Global Express XRS or nothing at all!




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        • Barney

          Absolutely….go get two! NO, make that THREE!




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          • Daniel

            One for me, the rest for the staff and crocodile luggage. Where do I sign up?




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  • Chris

    Oh its stunning, historic and very opulent with tons of character, its very pretty. Its older, but its very classy, regal almost. Personally I love it.




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    • Barney

      YES! A person (Man, woman?) with BRAINS, true taste, style and intelligence 🙂




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  • Limedaiquar

    No.




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    • NOVA Ben

      I nominate you for the “most concise” award




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  • rob

    Beautiful older home. It is just on too small a lot in a kind of boring area. The designers in LA are masters at fitting mansions on small lots. I like the house but just not the location so much. The renovated kitchen, open living area looks odd in this old house. But it seems to be well done.




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    • lambskin

      The kitchen and living area is a mess.




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  • NOVA Ben

    I’m with rob on this…the home is great and the history rich, but it’s a shame about the lot.




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  • marc22

    Elegant and restrained, something that has not been mastered by many of todays builders. Thankfully its missing all the out of scale, gaudy and cheap architectural ornamentation that passes for elegance in many of todays mega-mansions.




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    • Barney

      BRAVO BRAVO BRAVO BRAVO, Marc……..I COULD NOT POSSIBLY agree with you more. Until I saw your post, I WAS gonna’ say “0h, GAWD! How on earth could 98% of the regular commentors on this site even spend FIVE SECONDS in this positively ANEMIC sorry excuse for A SHACK of a home with ONLY 9,329 square feet to breathe !?!? I MEAN, the master bedroom is probably ONLY 250 square feet or something absolutely HORRID like that! Annnnd, where do I put my 250 Ferrari’s and Bugatti’s ?!” LOL! You know, the ones who are ALL ABOUT true class, subtlety, NO egotism-run-amok, blah, blah, blah! (NOT!)

      While the lot is admittedly too small for the house, I GUARANTEE EVERYONE that is was MUCH (and appropriately) larger originally waaay back in 1913. Without even looking at the satellite pic, I’m positive that the bloody HATCHETT job that the property around this house endured since it’s inception is downright awful. And I have alllll the “cred” and knowledge to say that ’cause I’ve personally seen & photographed demo after demo after demo of some of this country’s MOST MAGNIFICENT mansions & grounds here in Grosse Pointe in my 51 years.

      This house is impeccable, REALISTIC (somewhat) and absolutely best of all, AUTHENTIC. Which as you so intelligently pointed about, makes the 99% of all the GARGANTUAN-MONSTROSITY, faux-elegant new builds in California and the rest of this country look like SWINES with gold rings in their snouts by comparison.

      W




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      • marc22

        Grosse Point??? OMG Barney…….all I think of when I hear Grosse Point is Rose Terrace. What a huge losss to Detroit and the country to have that masterpiece demolished and all its art and artwork auctioned off.

        I know the family tried for many years to sell it to a Detroit Art Museum, but it always came down to the fact that the museum also wanted an sizeable endowment and the family wouldnt budge. IT contained a collection of art and antiques that might take 100’s of millions to assemble today if the pieces were even available to purchase. Such a stunning elegant classical mansion and such a tragic loss.

        Grosse Point is no different than the north shore of Long Island, the Main Line outside Philly, North Chicago, etc. where large turn of the century estates were first built by the very best architects, landscape designers, decorators, etc, only to find that taxes, upkeep and changing lifestyles would doom the vast majority of these treasures within 30 – 40 years of their construction. Todays mega-mansions may cost many millions, but most lack any character, class, elegance, subtle grace and craftsmanship that could be found in the historic homes of 100 years ago.




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        • Barney

          You’re obviously a learned & cultured guy, Marc 🙂 If you haven’t seen them yet, search for “Rose Terrace” on this site, and from about a year or so ago, I posted three videos, which are from either an hour or half-hour long special done by a local news channel here in metro-Detroit from ’71 (I think), hosted by a then popular Anchor Man. He takes you through a detailed & EXCELLENT tour of the house, with more history on each one of the masterpiece works-of-art that Anna Dodge bought than you can believe. I also posted another, separate, 4th video which is just slideshow of great historical black & white shots of the mansion & grounds, with an overlay of fascinating & truly astounding facts about the house in every frame. I am closely tied to the 2nd Rose Terrace, in that my late Aunt was a fixture on the G.P. social scene for years, and she created HUGE, beautiful flower arrangements for the VERY last dinner party held in the house the night before it was torn down. :-(((




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        • Barney

          Also, it wasn’t exactly the family that tried to approach (I THINK it was the D.I.A., the Detroit Institute of Arts) the museum, it was Anna Dodge herself. She had heard the Eleanor Ford, the wife of the late Edsel Ford, was going to (or either had, by the late 60’s) set up a trust fund to care for her MAGNIFICENT Albert Khan, lake front mansion built on a HUGE piece of land (that I grew up about 4 minutes walking distance from) in perpetuity after she would die for the public’s use & enjoyment of the house & grounds. Once Anna got a quote from either the D.I.A., or whomever it was for how much it’d take to do the same thing for Rose Terrace II, she farted a whole RIGHT through her handmade, Italian-silk, baggy, old-lady, granny panties & totally forgot about the idea. OUR LOSS…CHEAP OLD HAG. But, she DID donate all the priceless pieces of (16 & 17th Century, French) furniture and art to the D.I.A. that were in her most important & largest room in the house, the Music Room, where it’s still all there to this day to drool over. Google it.




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      • Chris

        yes to all above. I agree 100%




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      • NOVA Ben

        Barney, is it wrong that I picture you foaming at the mouth, with one eye twitching, and a vein threatening to pop in your forehead? 😉

        To be clear, I do agree that the home is gorgeous.




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        • Barney

          LOLOL! I love your picture, Ben! That’s about it, when I hear a certain person’s opinions about what constitutes a “mansion” here on this site. He & I could NOT possibly be any more different. Just picture the late, wonderful actor named Herbert Lom….he played Chief Inspector Dreyfus in all the “Pink Panther” CLASSIC comedy movies starring the late, great Peter Sellers & directed by the one and only comedy Genius, the late Blake Edwards. Lom continually has his left eye twitching violently the more & more Clouseau drives him INSANE! Hysterical movies….if you haven’t ever seen one, GO RENT ONE….I guarantee you you’ll pee your pants.




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          • Jeff P.

            Well, we have different opinions on luxury homes, but I am with you on Herbert Lom and the Pink Panther movies. 🙂




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          • Jeff P.

            Also, I love how passionate you get with your point of view, even when I don’t agree. Bring it!




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      • Daniel

        Darling Barney, call me crazy, but “True” class, subtlety, and everything else you mentioned cannot be ascertained by reading comments on a blog. Just as you love your single room asylums, I love my grand, opulent estates [this one not being in that mix] with garages that rival those at international airports (capacity wise). My love of cars, homes and all things expensive obviously run contrary to your view of material things.




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        • Barney

          Ohhh, Darling Daniel……how we diametrically, inextricably and eternally disagree. You regularly misunderstand me…..”Single room asylums” as you so incorrectly put it, are about as far from what the best of modern design can be. And the ENDLESS and obsessed fantasy of conitnued material acquisitions is, I assure you, looked upon oh-so-more-negatively rather than positively by the majority of people in this country (I believe). You and I would make GREAT Super Hero Enemies.




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          • Daniel

            Gold versus Gossamer. Love it.




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          • Kyle

            Like of fine material things doesn’t mean one is obsessed with and driven by materialism. Don’t confuse desire for fine consumer goods with crass materialism.




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  • Andrew

    This house was used in the filming of Charlie Wilson’s War, I’ve always wondered what the rest of the house looked like…




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    • Chris

      was it really?




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      • Andrew

        Yeah, it’s the house of the character played by Julia Roberts.




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        • Chris

          That is so cool, I guess i’ll have to watch that movie then.




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  • Jeff

    It is a beautiful and historic home but anyone interested should do some diligent research before making an offer. The current owners are embroiled in litigation against the former owners over faulty mechanical renovations. The home was also featured on an early episode of Jeff Lewis’ flipping out when he was still with his former partner Ryan. The owners contracted them to oversee some renovations and the wife out-bitched Jeff Lewis, no easy feat, and he walked away from the job. Here are two links to great articles which will fill in the blanks (more stories available on the web if you do a little searching):

    http://la.curbed.com/archives/2012/04/mindbogglingly_pedigreed_chandler_house_hits_the_market.php

    http://articles.latimes.com/2012/mar/04/local/la-me-chandler-estate-20120305

    I smell a long sit on the market for this one.




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  • Kyle

    Don’t care for it at all. As for it being an original home, I have seen lots of original homes that are far nicer than this.




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