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Healthcare entrepreneur Young Yi has proposed plans to build a 25,424 square foot mega mansion at 494 River Bend Road in Great Falls, VA. Modeled after Versailles and dubbed “Le Chateau de Lumiere”, the lavish home will boast five bedrooms, grand double staircase, gallery running the length of the home, three two-car garages, an elevator, swimming pool, pool house and more. The lower level alone will boast a wine cellar, gym, billiards room, home theater with concession stand, spa, sauna, card room, recreation room, gallery, kitchen and a guest bedroom. On the third floor, the master bedroom suite will take up an entire wing and consist of a study, sitting room, gallery and four other rooms. It is expected to cost $15 million to $20 million to build.

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  • rob

    Can’t someone grab him before he starts to build this cookie cutter piece of crap and set him down with some great architects. Before he spends this kind of money he should devote at least a week to researching the best architects and architecture and then maybe he can build something worthwhile. If you are spending twenty million to build a house what would a 100,000 in consultantcy matter?




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    • NOVA Ben

      While I may not personally be a fan of this style of architecture, it is based on an actual style, and takes after legitimate historical influences (at least from the front). So, while the style has indeed been done before, it does not by any means qualify as “cookie cutter”, and I think it would at least take us seeing floor plans for that term to be in any way warranted.

      And did you ever stop to consider that maybe the person proposing this home HAS consulted professionals and researched architects and arrived at this home as the one he wants to build? It’s kind of ridiculous of you denigrate someone as essentially clueless when, in all likelihood, they have indeed done their homework and are guilty of nothing but having different taste than you.




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    • NOVA Ben

      Furthermore, “piece of crap” and “sit him down with some great architects” seem to be attacks on the quality of construction, materials, specific layout, and so on, none of which we know anything about yet. Let’s wait for this place to take shape before we insult what isn’t even there yet.




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      • Bill in NY

        Ben, leave the boob alone! He’s not happy unless he’s not happy. Which, actually, is what can be said for 80% of the posters here.




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  • Mark

    Kenny

    I think for the month of May we should boycott the word ‘boast’ from your postings. It’s overused. A mansion boasting 5 bedrooms is an oxymoron.




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    • Kenny Forder

      LOL, but I love that word =P




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      • Mark

        I know, now you ‘boast’ about boast!! The irony!!
        By the way – love the site. I check it a few times a day.
        What surprises is me is the amount of wealth there is in this world.




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  • J.Danny.McNamara

    “Versailles! Have mercy, puppies. Could there be anything more uncouth than naming your newly built, Wal-Mart sized house Versailles? Your Mama would laugh our socks off if it just weren’t so damn sad.”
    Only the realestalker can say what I’m thinking.




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  • J.Danny.McNamara

    Also, if my homes name is ‘house of light’ it better never look as dreary and scary as it does in that picture.




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  • Sam

    Wow, I’m excited to see what it looks like when its finished! I actually think it looks quite impressive and looks very similar to “The Manor” in Beverly Hills.




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  • Daniel

    Good for him. I just hope it doesn’t end up looking it was built out of Styrofoam.




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  • Grrrowler

    What is the fascination with basing future white elephant houses on French chateaux? Oh wait, my question answers itself. The terrible “Versailles” near Orlando, Champ D’or in TX, and Fleur de Lys are all great examples of houses that started with delusions of grandeur but have languished for years waiting for someone to want them. I can only imagine that this will end up the same way.

    Based on the renderings, it doesn’t look like this house will set new standards for taste or style. However, it will be a great monument to Mr. Yi’s wealth and ego!




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  • James

    ITS BEAUTIFUL!!! I WANT TO SEE MRE OF IT!!! 😀
    btw Kenny i love the word BOAST also ha ha 😀




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  • Joejoe509

    The amenity list sounds yummy, but I’m not sure about the promotional picture above. It’s far too stately and overwhelming for my tastes. The master suite sounds like a dream. I would love for my master to take up a whole wing like a house unto itself. 🙂




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  • www.PriceyPads.com

    I do not agree with this at all. The linked news article says it all:

    “They also object to the owners knocking down acres of trees to build a home in a neighborhood that was specifically created to be a wooded retreat from go-go Washington.”

    Knocking down acres of trees to create your “dream house” is just wrong.




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    • Mark

      Do you own a car? Cause the knock down trees for roads and highways… You may be guilty too…When you have your cheap Orange Juice in the AM, they used highways/downed trees to get it to your tummy.




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    • NOVA Ben

      Knocking down lots of trees in a neighborhood known as a wooded retreat may be questionable, but you can’t honestly be against it wholesale…most highly developed places on the East Coast would not have been able to be developed without taking out massive amounts of trees. That’s a flimsy argument.




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    • Joejoe509

      This is only true to a certain point. If the others in that community are looking for a reason to block the house and trees are their only argument, it’s kinda stupid. But if they are TRULY concerned for the environment and the asthetic appeal of their neighborhood, then I say it’s a legitimate point to make. Otherwise, stay out this guy’s business and let him build his damn house.




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      • Mark

        Agreed.




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    • Jeff P.

      I can kind of see your point – I prefer houses where the trees come almost all the way up to the sides of the house. Nothing more beautiful than mature hardwoods around a beautiful house. Many developers clear-cut a lot just because it makes it easier (cheaper) to put the house and related infrastructure in place, but I have never liked that style myself. Also, some home buyers really love football field sized lawns, but I have never been part of that group either.

      Ultimately, the homeowner will have his neighbors to contend with, and no matter the price of the home, its a heck of a way to move into a neighborhood.




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    • James

      Another case of save the trees kill the children…this house will create tons of jobs for families… you idiot God gave us trees to use…to make paper out of,to make homes out of,to make hardwood floors,and cabinets out of…and don’t forget FIREWOOD!!! the guy owns the property so stay out of his business and get involved in yours… typical human,dont have enough stuff to do in your own life so you have to medel in other people’s lives…




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  • NOVA Ben

    I don’t personally have any interest whatsoever in this place…the style has been done over and over, and if this is being built as a spec home with no buyer in mind, it’s going to sit empty for a long, long time. The housing market may be stronger and less affected by the housing downturn in DC than other areas in the country, but properties of this scale will feel the hurt no matter where they’re built.

    As for the quality of the finished product, that’s yet to be seen, and there’s still a chance, however small, that it will be a stunning home. I can’t claim anything about that until it’s done.




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    • rob

      “The style has been done over and over” Hence the term cookie cutter. Thankyou for you support.




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      • NOVA Ben

        The GENERAL STYLE has been done. Just as Colonials, Craftsman, Beaux Arts, Georgians, New England etc etc etc have been done over and over. It’s the variation within the groups, and the quality to which they’re done that matters, not the over-arching style. So no, I do not give you my support. Cookie cutter implies EXACT COPY. I’ll give you some help since this seems to be challenging you….a cookie cutter makes a high number of IDENTICAL COOKIES. If they took the exact plan from which The Manor was created, and plopped it down in Great Falls, VA, THAT would be cookie cutter, just like any given model that Toll Brothers builds can be considered cookie cutter.

        I hope I’ve made myself clear this time.




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        • rob

          you will give me your support!!!




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  • Tay

    20 million to build but prob wont get a penny over 5.




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  • marc22

    Although the rendering is dark and dreary what is important is the facade does appear to have great proportions and the scale of the details, from the columns to the windows to the mansard roof all seem very well done. Of course anything can happen once and if this goes into construction, but if the materials selected are decent and the interiors finished to the same degree as the exterior then it might be a very beautiful home. Good luck though trying to build this on spec and praying for a buyer.




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