This historic manor house is located in Puddletown, Dorchester, Dorset, United Kingdom. Situated on about 9 acres, this Grade II listed country mansion dates back to the 16th century and was altered in c1690. Impressive entrance gates lead you to the front of the house where you enter the reception hall with 17th century wood paneling and a splendid oak staircase leading to the first floor galleried landing. The ground floor boasts a formal living room, formal dining room, gourmet kitchen, family room, garden room, utility room and more. The 2nd floor boasts a master suite and 4 secondary bedrooms suites. In the western end of the house is a self-contained wing arranged over two floors with 2 bedrooms. The spectacular grounds offer formal lawns and herbaceous borders, fine topiary yew hedges, fruit trees, rose garden, greenhouse and a separate paddock. It is listed at £4,950,000 or $7,858,719.

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  • rob

    Gorgeous. I love how they have just updated it without changing the character of the house. All of the furniture looks like it could have been in style a couple of hundred years ago, but it is brand new. The house looks clean and modern while still looking like an English country house. The decorator and the renovator did a fantastic job. Now I just wonder if Puddletown is full of puddles.




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  • Daniel

    The certainly has some great bones to it. Exterior is very pretty minus the exaggerated chimneys – I’d cut them down by a good two feet. The interior has its hits and misses. Hits include the living room, master bedroom, foyer and family room. Dining room is a miss because of the low ceilings heights and overall cheapness of the room. Kitchen is a complete letdown. Other misses include the flat-screen TV’s on the cheap stands in the middle of the living and family rooms. Couches in the family room were stolen from a 1970s thrift shop. I actually like the all-white decor of the living and master. Price seems reasonable, but without Wikipedi-ing Puddletown I’m going to assume it is very much in the countryside.




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  • Grrrowler

    It’s a beautiful historic country house. I love the exterior and the grounds…OK, as I’m typing this I opened the listing and realize its heading is almost word for word what I wrote. So, I’ll start again and say that I think it’s a great house and I love its history. The exterior and grounds: I wouldn’t change a thing.

    Sadly I can’t say the same thing about the interior. The historic details have been saddled with a frumpy and tired-looking interior. It looks like an old dowager with too much makeup and a thinning hair. If I were going to live in a restored 16th century house, I would want it to have not only the charm of the period but a sense of history. I would want something like the sitting room of Easton Neston (in the latest Arch Di): http://www.architecturaldigest.com/decor/2012-05/easton-neston-house-england-slideshow#slide=3 This interior makes me sad, and has none of the traditional comfortableness of an English country house.




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  • NOVA Ben

    Gorgeous exterior and surroundings. Interior falls flat on its face, with the kitchen being particularly offensive.




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  • Limedaiquar

    Wow, interior is a huuuuuuugge let down.




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  • weisser

    The house is like a Christian shelter.
    The interiors are incredibly boring. I would have felt completely depressed in this rooms. Staircase area is not bad, but the wood paneling is too monotonous.
    Oh, just a moment … Is this house from Europe? Oh, I change my mind. It’s so beautiful! Excellent! Great!




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  • ZigZagBoom

    So funny. Americans still just don’t get it. “Interior falls flat on its face, with the kitchen being particularly offensive.” A too-fancy kitchen implies you actually want to spend a lot of time in there. Why? That area is for your caterers or servants. The rest of the interior is a bit frumpy, but so is Windsor Castle. I’d take this place over 99% of hideous American McMansions.




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    • Limedaiquar

      What particularly don’t we get? If that kitchen was for caterers and servants only. It would have looked like a commercial kitchen. I don’t see any top of the line appliances in there. So you hate McMansions but you’d buy a house with the kitchen…of a McMansion?




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    • weisser

      A too-fancy kitchen implies you actually want to spend a lot of time in there
      —————————————————————————-
      You hit the bull’s eye 🙂




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    • Joejoe509

      I don’t think there is hardly anyone here that would take a McMansion over this. That’s for sure. I just want the kitchen to match the price of the property regardless of how much time I spend there. I don’t want the kitchen to be the weakest link of the property. I think if you’re going to have a servant kitchen, it needs to be tucked away and more commercial looking. To me, a “servant” kitchen is similar to the mechanical room. It needs to work, but no one needs to see it. The “regular” kitchen is just as much of a meeting place as the living room is. I don’t spend more than 30 mins in the bathroom, but I want that to look nice too. I’m sorry if that’s not the European way…




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    • Grrrowler

      I’m not exactly sure what “it” you’re referring to. Is “it” the fact that we don’t live our lives pretending to be in an episode of Upstairs, Downstairs? While the Queen and her family may not hang out in the kitchens at their various castles and palaces, the house in this post is neither a castle nor palace (you yourself say so in a post further down). I know for fact that many very wealthy people, be they American or European, do spend time in their kitchens and like them to be worth spending time in. It doesn’t mean the wife is going to whip up a meal for 20 guests, but not every wealthy person feels such disdain for the kitchen areas of their house. If the kitchen is such an unimportant room in a house like this, at least to wealthy English folks, why does the agent include it in the handful of photos of the interior? Knight Frank seem to think that it’s somewhat important to a prospective buyer.

      I would not hold Windsor Castle up as an example of high style, or as an example of a modern English mansion. It’s a fascinating and beautiful place dripping with history but the state rooms (sorry, I’ve not been into the private quarters so I can’t speak of those) are designed to impress and convey that sense of history; they are not meant to feel like a home.

      And for the record, not every American finds McMansions appealing, and not every Brit is Petra Ecclestone.




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  • Joejoe509

    I’m going to agree with a little of Daniel and a little of Grrrowler. Overall the exterior is very nice – with the exception of those chimneys. Your eyes immediately grab them and it uneccesarily shrinks the rest of the house. Like there was supposed to be another level up there, but was dismantled except for the chimneys. I think a possibly easier solution would be to put some adornment along the top edge of the roof (like a French mansion?) to visually shrink the chimneys and draw your eye elsewhere. My only exception – if those chimneys are a historical architectural element and I’m just uneducated in such things. In which case, leave them alone and suck it up.

    Inside, it’s boring as hell. Why do Britains prefer oversimplified, unadorned interiors? Why do they take great classic exteriors and shoehorn bland modern interiors into them? Yuck. I can tell that this house used to be much more opulent. Over the years it has systematically lost most of its charm. The kitchen in particular appears to have been gutted and replaced with an uglier updated one. There’s very little of the interior that is either comfortable or fancy. It misses both targets when one of them would have been acceptable.




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  • ZigZagBoom

    “Why do Britains prefer oversimplified, unadorned interiors?”

    Because they don’t pretend to be something they are not. This was never an Easton Neston. This was a relatively simple home of the comfortable, lower-landed gentry.




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    • Joejoe509

      It’s not just this home. Everytime I see a featured British home, it’s got a boring copycat Candy & Candy modern interior. Interiors such as this and failed C&C interiors just don’t match the exterior at all and that’s a darn shame. Of course there’s exceptions and there’s a zillion nice British homes so I’m sorry for generalizing.




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  • Oliver

    Beautiful bones to it, front facade is nice, rear needs work… some sort of stone patio or something. interior isnt bad, in fact i like the furnishings for the most part but the kitchen is horrendous and so is that flat screen in the living room.




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