This castle inspired home is located at 32 Rue d’Edimbourg in Quebec, Canada. It features a stone clad exterior and multiple turrets. Inside there is over 6,850 square feet of living space with 6 bedrooms, 4 full and 2 half bathrooms, sweeping floating staircase, formal living and dining rooms, 2-story great room, double height gourmet kitchen with adjoining breakfast room, hexagon shaped veranda, an upstairs loft, 4-car garage, formal garden and a swimming pool with waterfalls. It is listed at $3,880,000.

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HOMES OF THE RICH POPULAR TOPICS
  • NOVA Ben

    I’ve come to dread looking at homes that are described as “______-inspired”. “Inspired” usually translates roughly to “a rough facsimile of” or “a poorly-executed tribute to”. That said, this home was a little better than I expected given its status as a “castle-inspired” home. The interior looks comfortable, even though it doesn’t do anything particularly exciting. I don’t like the wood paneling in that weird indoor barbecue area, it looks cheap. Most of the indoor spaces would look better with a little more color, as usual. I do like the kitchen.

    The exterior I’m not so sure about…these castle-esque designs always come off with varying degrees of cheesiness to them, although this one doesn’t look nearly as bad as some of the others we’ve seen that claim castle inspiration. The large turret to the right of the entrance looks too big compared to the rest of the facade.

    I must make a blatant gripe, though. I REALLY wish real estate photographers would NOT do their primary work at night. It does not give an accurate representation of what the property looks like under normal daylight conditions, for the interior as well as the exterior, although primarily the latter. Throwing in a photo or two to show us what they’ve done with exterior lighting is fine, but the bulk of the images really need to be during the day.




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    • Mark

      Very good critique.




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    • Grrrowler

      I agree about the nighttime shots. Obviously the rooms are lit specifically for the pics, and won’t look anything like that in “real life”, either in the day or evening.




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    • Rocco

      I like this home!

      The barbecue/ wood plank area would be a screened in porch in the US; however, it’s Quebec, which get’s extremely cold.

      They get 2-3 weeks of tropical like weather in July, then it’s back to 60/70 F degrees during the day and nights that are cold whenever you’re there.

      Most coldweather climate homes have wood tone panels in rooms to offset the neverending snowy white landscape.

      The quebecois are closer to their euro roots and the architecture in the area reflects that. Anyone that has been to Montreal can see the european influence.

      The Acadian french from the Canadian east coast have their own spin on things – including the language. The Acadian immigrants are where NewOrleans got it’s style – language wise and architectually speaking.

      The house was decorated for christmas and the tri-teir candy display on the island was taking-up a space that is most likely used with bar stools at the counter – which would take up more space.

      The only thing out of place in this house is the tile in the master bath (floor/fireplace) – it’s cheap and doesn’t fit with the rest of the house!

      We all know homes put up for sale are “staged” – nuetralized, decluttered, and depersonalized! I don’t understand why people keep complaining about things that can easily be changed with a can of paint and a trip to the furniture store?!




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  • Jeff

    Overall, I can’t say I dislike this house. Obviously not everything fits my image of my perfect house. But this place looks livable, as compared to some other homes we’ve all seen.

    On a side note, looking at this place on Bing, the style of this house is a welcome change to the rest of the homes in the neighborhood. And I’ve never seen a neighborhood with so many houses that have pools. It’s almost every house.




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  • lambskin

    The sitting area off the dining room is awkard.




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  • Daniel

    Exterior isn’t bad. Interior has some nice parts and some cookie-cutter parts. The kitchen is probably the biggest letdown – terrible layout.




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  • Grrrowler

    When I began looking at the pics I liked it. The exterior is borderline cheesy, but I think it works. Fortunately it ended up more Gothic Revival than Cinderella’s Castle. It occurred to me that if it were 120 years old, I would think it was really cool.

    The interior has potential that isn’t fully realized. Getting rid of the badly-scaled furniture would help, but some of the spaces are awkwardly proportioned. A lot of that could have been fixed by using lower ceilings in some of the spaces, specifically the kitchen and formal living room. The kitchen layout isn’t bad, but I think it would feel like working in a warehouse; as the proverbial “hearth” of the home, it’s anything but cozy.

    Picture 4 shows what I consider to be a fatal flaw in the design: the master bed is visible from the entrance foyer. Maybe the bed can be relocated (although it doesn’t look like it could be), but I still wouldn’t live with the fact that any visitors could see right into the master bedroom if the doors were open. Looking at some of the other pics, it’s entirely possible that the master bathroom is visible from the formal living room.

    There is surprisingly little detail in a lot of the other rooms. Some of the bedrooms are downright boring.




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  • lambskin

    I love the use of booze bottles as table top decoration in the living room (pic 5).




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  • Luke

    Can anyone explain to me the specific reasons why they find the rooms ‘disproportioned’ or furniture ‘poorly scaled’? I see these assessments made a lot about the homes on this site but very rarely am I ever able to see it also. Don’t take this as an affront, for I am just keen to learn about how others appraise homes.




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    • Barney

      Hi Luke……….I’m a former, regular contributor here who hasn’t posted in a long time. And I am the HUGE ODD MAN OUT here, ’cause I love WELL-DONE contemporary and mid-century modern homes, but 99.99% of the regular guys here HATE them and think that I don’t know my ass from my elbow. As a former high-end realtor who’s been in PLLLLENTY of very expensive, historic beautiful homes in the Grosse Pointe area of southeastern Michigan, I can tell you that all of that 99.99% regularly find fault with what is truly an impeccably done home, and would be the ABSOLUTE WORST CLIENTS to work with as they’d be perfectly impossible to please. The pics, appearance, decoration, colors and almost everything about this home are downright beautiful, and I KNOW what I’m talking about.




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      • Daniel

        My goodness, someone is in a cynical mood. Since we are being a tad on the rude side, I’ll just say that you’d probably be the worst type of Realtor to work with: the one with the ego. You’d be the Realtor who takes clients to homes YOU would love to live in, and then gets angry when the clients don’t agree with your OPINION. And not that you’d care, but give me a price range and I’ll find a home I’d love to call home. Just because I point out the flaws more often than I do the
        positive attributes does not mean I don’t know what I’m talking about.

        Responding to Luke’s original inquiry, I personally don’t think this home is poorly proportioned. I think the kitchen layout is bad because of 1) the empty space in photo 8 – maybe its the angle of the photo and 2) The fact that the range is at an angle in relation to the island. If you’re cooking something on the stove and turn around to put it on the island, you shouldn’t have to shuffle to avoid the corner of the island. You should be able to just do a 180 and put it on the counter without moving out of your space.




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  • T Man

    For a house that has a lot of nice details, the pool is a total let down.




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