Halcyon Hall is a superb family home built with modern precision in an Elizabethan style. It is located in Hertfordshire, England and was built in 2005. It boasts approximately 14,000 square feet of living space with an 8400 square foot first floor, 3600 square foot 2nd floor and a 2000 square foot lower level. It is listed at £15,000,000 or $24,061,500.

HERE ARE THE LISTING DETAILS:

The internal appearance of the property is testament to the attention to detail applied to the design. Custom made solid oak doors, skirting and architraves are fitted amongst extensive oak panelling and a magnificent oak staircase, which leads from the salon to the galleried first floor landing. The ground floor has superb open reception areas with double doors opening from the salon through to the family room, which has a magnificent marble fireplace with a gas flame effect fire. Three sets of double door open out onto the terrace and gardens beyond. The vaulted ceilings and extended windows are a feature throughout ensuring high levels of natural light. The windows themselves are made of steel for increased security and encased within oak frames, whilst the
attached blinds are controlled by the Crestron control panels.

The master bedroom suite with twin dressing rooms, sitting area and en-suite bathroom, highlights the quality of the property with handcrafted furniture, hand painted features throughout and ample space in every room.

The Crestron Building Management unit controls all heating and ventilation as well as the many high level security measures. There is an AV system fitted throughout the house and a superb 13 seat cinema room on the lower ground floor with high definition screening.

To the rear of the property is a fully enclosed garden, predominantly lawned, flanked with a series of pebbled pathways and herbaceous borders. Within the garden there are a number of marble statues including a water fountain and waterfall. These features combined with the wide selection of trees and shrubs are great focal points in what is a very private and secluded garden.

To the front of the property there is a paved area suitable for parking numerous cars behind the security of the electric, wrought iron gates.

CLICK HERE FOR  THE LISTING

  • Daniel

    Built in the Elizabethan style without the Elizabethan charm. Looks like something you’d see in Colorado. Exterior ain’t bad but the rear is very tract home-ish. Interior is odd at best. The two-story hallway looks incredibly tacky for some reason. The living room is unbelievably strange, from the gigantic couches to the bite size fireplace to the miniscule looking loft section. Dining room is the most charming room but looks incredibly low. Is the room is photo 6 purposely painted in seasonal colors? If anything, I do like the rolling hills in the back yard.




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  • Grrrowler

    The house would have an Elizabethan architect rolling over in his grave. As Daniel said, the rear facade is pure tract house. The front facade looks like someone took an English cottage and stretched and pulled it out of shape so that the proportions are all wrong.

    While the exterior is trying to be cottage-y, the interior is trying to be stately home, but the fun house version of a stately home. The proportions of the entrance hall are all wrong and it looks like a side gallery in a medieval museum, but fill with miniature furniture. The scale of the living room is very weird; the sofas look giant compared to the paneling, loft, and fireplace side chairs. The dining room looks like someone lowered the ceiling and you’d have to stoop to walk through it. Maybe it’s the camera lens making the rooms look this way…




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  • rob

    I was really prepared to hate this place based on the exterior but I found the interior very charming and I liked the odd proportions and layout. I found myself wondering what would happen if one of those suits of armor were to fall on someone going down the hall. I like the low ceilings and the detail work on the ceiling in the dining room and the brocade tapestries in the (great hall?) I have a feeling that this place has to really be experienced in person to tell if it works.




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  • NOVA Ben

    This is gross. The exterior is not awful, minus the tract home look of the rear, as others have said. The interior is just too over the top and too weird in its proportions. In reference to those who said the dining room looks low, I think it’s just the wacky proportions of the paneling, pictures on the wall, and odd furniture playing tricks with your perception…very unsettling. Sorry rob, I don’t think I have to see this place in person to know it doesn’t work.




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  • NOVA Ben

    Also, a question for any Brits out there…or those who know general things about British real estate…what does the term “freehold” mean that I keep seeing on British listings?




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    • Venom

      Freehold means you basically own it outright like most any other properties.
      There is also leasehold which I am sure you have seen with businesses where they own the property for a term like 99 years or so. My neighbor has a condo in the Celebration development in Florida and if I am not mistaken they told me that was a leasehold for 99 years or so. I am not sure how that works out in the end, never bought a property in such a manner, maybe someone else knows.




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  • Plain J.

    The landscape is incredible! However, the interior isn’t that bad.




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