From Matthewbeckett.com-

Tusmore Park is located in Oxfordshire, England and was established as far back as 1385. The original house was replaced by a very grand classical building in the late 1770s. This was replaced in 1964 by a smaller, less grand construction. However, in the late 1990s the estate was bought by wealthy businessman Wafic Said, benefactor of the Oxford Said Business School. He held a design competition for another replacement of the house at Tusmore, and this was constructed in 2000, once again in the classical style and grandeur at a reputed cost of some £30 million. The new Tunsmore Park, designed by Sir William Whitfield, was a fitting replacement and almost of equal size to the previous Tusmore. The portico provides a dramatic entrance and is dominated by six monumental Ionic columns. In recognition of the quality of the new house Tusmore Park was awarded the prize for the “best modern house in the classical tradition” at the 2004 awards of the Georgian Group.

* Thanks to reader Christopher Lawrence for the tip!

  • Sam

    Cant believe how many times this house has been knocked down and rebuilt, I thought there’s usually guidelines when it comes to grade listed buildings. I really like the columns and cornices, it really makes the house look grander. Looks bigger from behind. Not to sure about the interior, looks a bit dated and tacky. Although most English country houses are situated on acres of land with little landscaping, this stands out like a sore thumb, I’d like to see a build up of shrubs around the house to make it look more characterful as if its been there longer..




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    • NOVA Ben

      When did the current system of grade listing begin? It says the last house to stand on the property was destroyed in 1961, so might that have been before that system started? I’m only casually familiar with the system so for all I know, it’s been around far longer than 1961.




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  • Daniel

    I’m usually a lover of these old English manors, but the exterior of this one is missing that extra something. Perhaps it’s the small windows, isn’t wide enough, or the front door; as-is, I give it a B-. Rear looks much more appealing to me. The lone interior picture is enough for me to say “Yes, please.”




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    • NOVA Ben

      This home’s only done in the *style* of “these old English manors”, since it’s relatively new. I’m sure the thing it’s missing is what Grrrowler discusses below.




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  • Grrrowler

    As has been said, this IS missing something, and for me that’s the patina that comes from decades, or centuries, of weathering on the outside, and life on the inside. I like the Palladian symmetry, but the house doesn’t call to me. I like the previous house shown at the link much better. This would look much better in the countryside of the Veneto than in Oxfordshire.




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  • Plain J.

    WOW! That is pretty interesting history for this property!




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  • rob

    I am with Sam on the landscaping here. This really does stick out. I like that they carried the grandeur of the style into the house itself and were true to that country house style. The back has beautiful parkland framing it. A country house like this is really my kind of dream home.




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  • NOVA Ben

    The home is certainly majestic and impressive, and respectfully done concerning the history of the property…

    BUT, reading over the article about the home and seeing what the history was like, I’m left feeling sad that SOME remnant of the former home isn’t still around. It’s really a shame that a property with such history has had it all but erased with the passage of time and successive owners. It’s also sad to look at the section of that site that’s dedicated to “houses at risk”. I fear that many of those properties may be gone soon too. Kudos to the people who try to avert the destruction of places with such rich history.




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