Paul Parmar’s Colts Neck, NJ mega mansion has gone into foreclosure. The estate, which is located at 19 Colts Gait Lane, was built by Polo Master Builders. Parmar is the founder of Pegasus Blue Star Fund and also a film producer. The lavish estate boasts a main house and an entertainment annex attached to the main house by an underground tunnel. Amenities include an indoor swimming pool, 2-lane bowling alley, wine cellar, gym, home theater, tennis court and 2 outdoor swimming pools (one of them being saltwater and surrounded by imported sand). According to PropertyShark.com, Paul owes $26.3 million on the property. The foreclosure case was brought by Deutsche Bank, which held a $23 million mortgage on the compound.

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  • Stigo

    What a huge mortgage, on a home this big




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  • george

    I don’t see it being worth half of what is owed.




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  • WrteStufLA

    I looked up the address on Google Maps satellite view — interesting how the estate, as built, is just as massive as in this rendering, but build in a far different layout.




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  • Daniel

    There is some beautiful mill work in the house. Kitchen is very strange though. Exterior design is pretty boring. I do like the jogging track around the perimeter.




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  • Barney

    LOVE like CRRRRRAZEE that YET ANOTHER revoltingly overdone, ghastly over-sized, indescribably wasteful “single family” HOTEL has bit the financial dust. The former owners immeasurable ego, greed and materialism have finally seen their end. The entire place is horrible.




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  • Grrrowler

    I think it’s an attractive enough house from the outside, but I wish the wooded setting had been left wooded; there were no large trees left near the house. Beyond that, it’s ridiculously large and just another monument to one person’s ego that may well become a white elephant.




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    • Doug

      i live right around the corner from this house and can at least say the one positive thing this guy did was not tear down many trees, the woods you see immediately behind his house are a town park. There is actually a trail that backs right up to his property and you can see the whole house pretty much. The land his house on was previously a horse farm.




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  • mak

    I’m kind of sick of this site at this point. Its not Kenny’s fault. He’s just showing houses, but the more I see, the more I’m revolted.

    This house is a case in point. So much excess consumption, and for what. Who could possibly ever enjoy a property like this in the face of so much pain suffered by so many; not only here in the US, but all over the world. I could not live with myself.

    It finally dawned on me that I really don’t want to have anything to do with fawning over properties owned by people who believe that the best way to spend their wealth is to consume as much as possible.

    Gluttony isn’t just about eating food to excess.

    Ta ta.




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    • Al Robinson

      Mak, believe me, I get what you’re saying, but remember that Kenny and Homes of the Rich are a nice distraction from the very same problems you’re talking about. Distraction is a great thing. 🙂




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  • Plain J.

    This is interesting!
    Kenny, can you do more posts like this?




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  • NOVA Ben

    Take a look at the rear elevation of this home…there are big differences from house to house as far as materials and EXACT layout, but the basic layout of this home has got to be one of the most common ones in the country for large-scale homes. I’ve seen this basic plan in some form in the majority of states in the country on bing maps birds eye view. The rear of the home always has a central portion with three french doors in the center with palladian windows for the second story portion. This central space is almost always flanked by the angled rooms you see on this house (sometimes one story, sometimes two like this home), and the next rooms out are always larger, usually one story rooms with three angled window walls.

    Take a look at the rear elevations for this sample of homes (and believe me, I’ve seen dozens more like these in other places):

    1. 7015 Carlisle Ln, Alpharetta, GA
    2. 639 Nalls Farm Way, Great Falls, VA
    3. 9514 Lynnhall Pl, Alexandria, VA
    4. 2 Stephens Rd, Mendham, NJ
    5. 9000 Bridge Forest Dr, Memphis, TN
    6. 1145 Laurelwood, Carmel, IN

    examples are everywhere, has anyone else noticed this? Some have huge garage additions, others have entire wings added on, but the base is always very similar.

    I bring this up to make a point…When I’m building my 30,000 sf dream home, I don’t want it to be based so closely on a design that’s this ubiquitous. And as an outsider looking at a fabulously expensive home, it sort of lowers the amount of admiration I might have for it…it makes me imagine that they just took a set of blueprints, made a few choice modifications to it and called it their own.




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  • john handsor

    Paul Parmar is a criminal. Could not happen to a nicer guy. happy foreclosure Paul.




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  • Sam

    I really like the Manision. It have every thing a person nee in his life. 39000sqft is more than enough. Interior of home is very nice.




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  • Daniel blanco

    I really like the mansion. It is awesome and its my dream home. actually home like this is dream home of every one .it need a lot of money and time to be built. it has every thing in it. It also have bowling court and 39000 sqft is large area.




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