This contemporary mansion is located in London, United Kingdom. It boasts heightened security with a high wall and electric gated entrance. It boasts 11,512 square feet of living space with 7 bedrooms and an indoor swimming pool. It is listed at £ 18,000,000 or $25,950,600.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Charlie

    Eh… the exterior kind of looks like its from a middle eastern village.




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  • Daniel

    100% pass for me. You can do so much better in London, although 11K+ sq ft would be hard to replicate.




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  • Grrrowler

    One of the best locations in any city anywhere, and one of the worst houses imaginable. There are nicer houses in this and nearby neighborhoods for the same money.




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  • Brian

    What are you guys talking about? This is award-winning architectural design. In Serbo-Crotia and Latvia.




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  • Mak

    This post is a joke, right? Amirite?

    29 MILLION clams for this crapper? Seriously?

    IF you’re gonna pay 29M for this place, then you should just tear it down and start all over.




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    • NOVA Ben

      Yeah…London’s real estate market is wild.




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  • NOVA Ben

    This place is pretty awful all around. Disjointed inside, with some spectacularly bad decor decisions, ugly on the outside too.

    This is 100% down to cultural differences I’m sure, as well as off-topic, but the general way that homes in the UK are laid out is odd to me. Compared to American homes (at least from the last 50 years or so) they’re very segmented…the rooms are highly isolated from each other (generally speaking), there’s little “flow”. Why is this? I’ve also noticed it’s common, for example, for the dining room to not be anywhere near the kitchen, which is also odd. Bedroom sizes, at least in the typical middle class home, are way way smaller too. It’s routine for a secondary bedroom to be, for example, 7 feet by 10 feet. Anyone from the UK or Europe have any comments?




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    • Iemand

      I’m not an expert on this (I should though…) but this is what I think:
      In general, European homes are smaller than American homes. The average house in The Netherlands is 100-150 square meters, which is about 1000-1600 square feet. A lot of homes here are also ‘rowhomes’ (is this the correct term?), something like this (photo: http://www.denhelderactueel.nl/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/rijtjeshuis.jpg) or ‘two homes under one roof’ (I really don’t know the English term for that one), like this (Photo: http://static.nieuwbouw-woningen.nl/Impressions/fm0/3cb4c5640477b8efe7ff12bc73ce80b5.jpg).

      A common layout in these homes is a hall, livingroom/diningroom (one room) and a kitchen on the first floor and 2-3 bedrooms and a bathroom on the second.
      The first floor is often enough one big room with kitchen, dining room and living room combined.

      Then dining rooms; real dining rooms (as in a room only for dining) is something I barely see here, most of the time we just eat in the kitchen or in a shared room with the living room; a ‘formal dining room’ isn’t really in our culture, we’re used to be very grounded people. It’s also a size issue; there isn’t simple enough room for it. I don’t know why dining rooms are not near the kitchen as you noticed.

      The smaller bedrooms is another size issue. This (http://www.catoire.nl/Foto%27s/DSC03425.JPG) is an average bedroom here. Things I see here (big (master) bedrooms with walk in closets and adjoining bathrooms) is something we only see in very expensive homes here. Most of the time there’s only one bathroom in a home.

      But I think you’re right. There’s a whole history behind this and it’s probably just down to cultural differences as you said.

      Just as I’m also thinking why so many American homes don’t have some sort of hallway/foyer, stepping right into the living room. Having bathrooms for each bedroom, often having very open backyards (common – hideous – sight here is this: http://vorige.nrc.nl/multimedia/dynamic/00207/Privacy_in_de_verl_207060e.jpg) etcetera.

      Hopes this helps. I’m open for more questions 😉




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    • Iemand
      • NOVA Ben

        Thanks, Iemand, that does help a little bit. The size difference between average homes does explain much smaller bedrooms, and combining the living and dining areas. I suspect that another reason is that more homes in Europe/Britain are very old, so the layout of that very old home filters through to the new, even if remodeling has been done. I would be curious to know more about why European homes seem more segmented though, especially because even very large British homes display this pattern of isolated/separated rooms.

        It sounds grandiose as an explanation, but I would suspect that there’s plenty of the whole capitalist, “bigger is better” going on as well. As I’ve mentioned before, America is (or was until recently, with this economy) very centered on consumption and a “more more more” mentality, so it only makes sense that things are bigger on average. Ah, one more random comment…the word you were looking for concerning “two homes under one roof” is “duplex”, at least here in America 🙂




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        • Iemand

          Being old is another reason indeed. In one of my classes about architectural history, the professor talked about the history of homes, one time British homes.
          Not that long ago (let’s say, the beginning of the 20th century) it was common to have servants there, especially the bigger homes. This was also visible in the floorplans; the area’s for the servants are seperated from the family, they had their own rooms, including stairs, kitchens etc. And every (non-servant) room had their own reason; dining, living, receiving guest etc.

          There’s probably a very clear reason, but I think it comes down to cultural differences.
          Oh, and I’ve heard the term duplex, just couldn’t think of it at the moment. 😀




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    • Andy

      I’m from the UK, and have spent some time in the USA, there is a huge difference in design, American homes from my experience seem to be what we call “open plan” where other than bedroom/bathrooms the rest of the house is almost one (very big) room.

      Where in the UK a lot of homes have entrance halls, which is possibly why the rooms seem more seperated. It could also go back to when famlies would have several generations under one roof, and naturally would want their own space. The average size of a home in the uk is also tiny in comparison to a lot of countries, (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/12/australia-has-the-biggest-homes-in-the-world.php) so we’re squeezing the same number of rooms into a smaller space, hence small bedrooms, that are probably smaller than prison cells in the States :P.

      I used to live in a pub built in the 1300’s, and the rooms where just as seperated there as they are where i live now (1970’s house) so it probably is just a cultural thing thats been the norm for so long no one really thinks about it.




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