This newly listed Mediterranean style estate is located at 6405 Primero Izquierdo in Rancho Santa Fe, CA. It was built in 2002 and is situated on 4 lush acres with a main house, swimming pool, pool house and a tennis court. The home boasts 15,500 square feet of living space with 6 bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, 2-story foyer with sweeping staircase, formal living and dining rooms, gourmet kitchen, breakfast room, family room, wood paneled office, home theater, wine cellar, 5-car garage and more. It is listed at $12,900,000.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Siobhan

    Doesn’t look like 4 acres, but the location is pretty nice. And I appreciate the tongue-in-cheek name of the street.




    0



    0
    • NOVA Ben

      Funny how exotic certain everyday phrases sound when you translate them to another language, huh?




      0



      0
  • Daniel

    Nice enough house. Interior is more Georgian than Mediterranean though. Exterior ain’t bad but it looks like they got lazy with the front entry. That street name is a little bit too long also…doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue either.




    0



    0
    • NOVA Ben

      I found it incredibly jarring how little “Mediterranean” was carried through to the interior of this home. It’s like two different homes, and while sometimes that works out okay, I don’t like it here.




      0



      0
  • richvanc

    Nice home, not nice price. Looking at the agent’s other listings … other just as nice homes for much less $$$, go figure 😉




    0



    0
  • Hugh

    One of my favorites so far in Rancho Santa Fe. There isnt much one could do to improve the house.




    0



    0
  • NOVA Ben

    I really don’t like how mismatched the interior design is with the exterior style. Like I said above, sometimes differing styles work, but I really don’t like the feel that that creates here. The exterior is attractive enough in isolation, as is the interior, but together it doesn’t work for me. And, at least from the air, the landscaping looks a little overdone to me, but that may very well look completely different if you were walking the grounds as opposed to viewing them from above.




    0



    0
  • Jason

    this house was actually featured in Beautiful Homes Magazine about 5 years ago complete with the floor-plans. the reason the house is confused stylistically is the man of the house is Cuban with a taste for mediteranean home and the wife is an Anglophile who had to have that style interior. it’s not bad, but seems a bit overgrown. it’s priced well for that neighborhood.




    0



    0
  • Venom

    I like the lot, the area and the exterior of the house.

    I would probably gut the interior of the house, I can’t say that I like any of it.




    0



    0
  • Grrrowler

    I think the interior looks well-done, but it’s way too east coast for my taste. As others have pointed out, there’s a definite mismatch between the interior and the exterior, which is a little jarring. I would like it so much better with a well-done Spanish or Mediterranean Italian-style interior. The interior ends up looking stodgy.

    The grounds look lovely, and the location within RSF is also pretty good. I, personally, like the street name. For the size of the house and lot, it seems like an OK price for this part of RSF.




    0



    0
  • j

    http://www.businessinsider.com/newport-beach-forclosure-acution-2011-5

    Here is an interesting article about the largest home in Orange County in forclosure




    0



    0
    • Venom

      Great site.
      Thanks for the head up.




      0



      0
  • DJL

    This is more a comment on California mansions than it is this house in particular. I just don’t understand why all these big California houses (or their Florida, Arizona and Nevada counterparts) don’t try and make use of solar energy and grey water collection systems. On older house I can see how people might worry about them being an eyesoar. But on new homes, it would be easy to design the roofs so that the solar panels can be hidden from view. People who are dropping >$4M on a new home should really consider spending an extra $30k and install a proper solar power system, especially if they live in an area where they have the ability to sell excess power to back to the grid. And in arid climates, I’d think that a grey water system would be a great way to maintain all those green lawns while reducing the water bill. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not an ecomentalist, I just don’t understand why somebody who’s willing to spend millions on a home wouldn’t want to spend a few extra dollars (in comparison), to reduce their own electricity and water bills.




    0



    0
  • NOVA Ben

    You make an interesting point there with the solar energy & gray water collection ideas. I know that in other industries, namely the automotive industry, California tends to be on the leading edge of legislation that concerns pollution and eco-friendliness. Cars sold in CA are up against more stringent regulations than in other states, so it makes me wonder if perhaps there are laws forthcoming at some point in the future that might make features like solar energy and water collection systems on homes compulsory. I’m no expert on the way the state governments work in this regard, but I don’t think it would be far-fetched for CA (or other states) to begin *requiring* a certain amount of such systems for all new-builds, beyond whatever is already required in the building codes. Or perhaps there already are some regulations in place?




    0



    0