This large Colonial style estate was built in 1895 and was completely renovated. It is located at 44 W Patent Road in Bedford Hills, NY and is situated on a little over 13 acres of land. It boasts 15,458 square feet of living space with 8 bedrooms, 9 full and 9 half bathroom, magnificent gardens, Lord & Burnham Greenhouse, indoor spa, swimming pool, tennis court, guest cottage, 6-car garage, 6-bay equipment barn and Equestrian facilities. It is listed at $17,900,000.

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  • Grrrowler

    The exterior is a little austere for my liking, and those bronze lions would be the first things to go (even though they provide the estate’s name). I like the rear elevation better than the front. Otherwise, I think it’s a lovely house, and I appreciate that it’s a true estate with plenty of land. It’s a nice change compared to the houses we see shoe-horned onto lots almost the same size as the footprint of the house.

    The interior restoration seems as if it was done very sympathetically. I wasn’t sure about the room with the fabric ceiling, but since it seems to be a less formal room, it works. I think the dining room is beautiful and can imagine spending several hours there over dinner with a roaring fire in the fireplace. There are tremendous possibilities for decorating this place. Overall, I quite like the entire thing.




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  • Daniel

    Considering it is over 100 years old, it looks very good. However, I think the interior is a little too reminiscent of the early 1990s in terms of the design. The thing that I hate the most is the french door on the second floor, directly above the front door. Looks completely out of place and ruins the front. The roof is also a little strange looking. The price is quite steep.




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  • NOVA Ben

    I do agree with Grrrowler about the general feel of sympathetic renovation here, but whenever I see listings of old homes that are reported to have undergone renovations, I always get a nagging voice in my mind asking how much of the original feel was lost in the process. Therein lies the problem though; you have to tread a thin line between making the home adequate for modern life and not sacrificing too much of what made the home outstanding in the first place. This home does look well done, and I definitely see some of what must be the original character of the structure as it was a century ago, so that’s encouraging to me. That said, I also agree with Daniel’s assertion that it’s a little too 1990s. Although, that was probably when the renovation was done, and in that case, if you put enough care into it and be mindful of the history of the home, you could easily update again while preserving the overall feel.

    I have no problem with the exterior style of the home, although it’s a little too white and plain for me. That opinion would be subject to change though, seeing as to how I’m working with a combination of bing’s BEV and shitty tiny photos, so I know I’m not getting the kind of detail I’d like. I also agree, Grrrowler, that it is nice to see a grand old estate that still sits on a few acres. So many times even other historic estates end up sitting on half an acre because most of the original land was sold off to be turned into a subdivision, but it’s nice that this one maintains at least part of what must have been a more substantial piece of land.




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  • Hugh

    Aint it funny how a big house + time = class

    If this was new id probably hate it. But i think its quite nice.




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  • Iemand

    I hate the exterior (seems a little bland) but the interior is quite nice actually. I agree with Grrrowler about the fabric ceiling, but that shouldn’t be a problem. But 17 million, that quite a lot…




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