This traditional European style mansion is located at 1029 Crescent River Pass in Suwanee, GA. It was built in 2008 and boasts 6 bedrooms, 7.5 bathrooms, formal living and dining rooms, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, family room, pub room with custom bar and card table, billiards room, home theater, gym, wine cellar, covered patio with fireplace and more. It is listed at $2,495,000.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LISTING

  • Grrrowler

    It’s not bad, but definitely not my style.

    The front facade is unbalanced, but the back is just terrible. Clearly someone has an aversion to landscaping when it came to the back of this house.

    The interior is nice but not overly special. The bones of the interior could easily accept many types of furnishings, so it will obviously appeal to a large audience. The interior has been staged to within inches of its life. The empty wine bottle on the sofa table in picture 7 are laughable; who does that in real life?!

    I don’t how real estate prices compare between here and Atlanta, but I thought they were lower there. Guessing what the square footage is, this house in Bellevue would command about the same asking price.




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    • Barney

      Agree with you regardingg the back of the house, Grrrowler, however it definitely looks as if they took that shot at the completely the wrong time. Either ALL the grass died or something like it, and STILL they took a photo of it! Go figure. Also agree with you on the over-staging……waaay too much, and while the flat screen or the wine bottle placements don’t bother me at all, what DOES drive me NUTS is the f*cking MOTORCYCLE in the lower level!?!? WTF!? The listing agent needs to be seriously reprimanded by their Broker, and get that shot removed PRONTO! I disagree with you though on the front of the house though….it’s quite lovely though. It’s very well balanced and true to an authentic, well done English Tudor.




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      • Grrrowler

        I like components of the front, but overall it doesn’t look good to my eye. What I see when I look at is that the right side (the viewer’s right side) of the house is heavier than the left. The diamond pane windows on the left side only serve to make it feel lighter, as does the light colored stone.

        As for the back, I understand that the grass will be brown in the winter, but there’s a total lack of any shrubs, or anything, near the house. I see empty flower beds that will (hopefully) be beautiful in the summer, but there are some evergreen shrubs that could be put at the back of the house and would do fine in the GA winters. As it is now, all that’s there is that ugly grill!




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      • Mak

        I wouldn’t call it Tudor at all. Its got too many mismash stuff going on to be authentic anything. For example, on the front facade, there are four different styles of windows along the second floor. The timbers/brick along the left side of the house are the only real “Tudor” design feature, but they clash with the lack of them on the right side of the house. The stone block facade on the first floor on the left, with the arched window frames are a Norman design element, not Tudor. The front entry is also a Norman design element, as are the small, narrow arched windows.

        I don’t believe the house is staged. I don’t know of any stagers that would go through the trouble of a) having a piano moved in, b ) hanging pictures in places that are hard to reach (like the one above the TV in #7) and c)bring a pool table and a motorcycle in. That stuff costs real money to rent, and move; far more than most builders are willing to spend.

        The listing says it has a three car garage, but I don’t see how. Is it a separate structure?

        I think a family owns this house, and simply ran out of money on the landscaping.




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      • NOVA Ben

        While I agree with the general consensus on over-staging (this home does look staged as hell, though tastefully so for the most part…empty wine bottle notwithstanding), I must take exception to your comment about the motorcycle, and I do so as an avid transportation enthusiast (cars, trucks, motorcycles, etc). There is NO difference between a person who spends thousands upon thousands of dollars on paintings to hang in their house and a person who spends the same on a collectible car or motorcycle. It is entirely possible that the owner is a motorcycle enthusiast who has a bike (or two or three) that he regularly rides, but also to have one or a few that are display pieces. Some classic and custom motorcycles (as well as cars) are never driven by their owners, but serve more as stationary art. Sometimes this is entirely aesthetic, but other times it’s because the piece is valuable and the owner either doesn’t want to risk it being crashed or he is maintaining its current condition for later on down the line when he might be able to make a profit on his investment. Long story short, the motorcycle in that picture looks to be a display piece more than anything, and I think it’s just as acceptable to put a bike there next to the stairway as a suit of armor or a statue. Just because a collectible or desirable motorcycle isn’t as common to see inside a house as a collectible painting doesn’t make it any less acceptable. The ONLY concern I would have about this bike inside the home is that it doesn’t leak anything onto the floor, which it doesn’t look like it has.




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        • Barney

          Sorry Ben, but as far as any truly world-class interior designers, or even any regularly successful designers will tell you, motorcycles as decorative objects will NEVER be considered legitimate. And to TRY & SELL YOUR HOUSE for Gods’ sake with one in a finished space is just ridiculous, no matter if you’re a billionaire with 10 Ducati’s and 10 vintage HARLEYS’…..it’s still seriously stupid.




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  • Daniel

    It’s not bad. I actually like a lot of the furnishings/details used, except the piano in the small living room. Also, the flat screen TV in photo 7 looks completely out of place.

    Overall I give it a B.




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  • Iemand

    I disagree with both of you on several thing:
    – The front is not balanced? How come? It looks better than most homes posted here. I agree with the back; that looks like an afterthought.
    – Why would you ever not like a piano? Only bad thing is it’s placed right next to a fireplace: not good. (if the fireplace is even used)

    But I agree with things like the landscaping and the flat screen TV. The theater is ok, but could look much better. Overall, I do like this house; change the theater a bit, do some landscaping (back will look better with proper landscaping) and you’ve got a great home.




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    • Daniel

      I feel like a piano is a useless way to fill a room. Designers love to throw them in as if playing a piano is as common as riding a bike. Besides, it takes up half the room and obstructs the view.




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      • Grrrowler

        I love a piano in a music room or in a large entry foyer so that it can be heard all over the house. But in a living room, in a staged house, it’s a bad idea.




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  • jd

    I’ll tell you what. I have been visiting this site about once a week for about six months or so but have only posted a couple of times……..but i must say, the regular posters here are a realy tough crowd and very seldom like much of anything. As for this home, the outside is nice but the inside is awesome to me.




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  • NOVA Ben

    The front elevation is too busy, too many disparate design themes going on. The rear is boring with not enough landscaping, as several people have already said. Inside is very elegant, though a bit too formal for my taste…although it’s hard to tell how much of this is due to the over-staging that commenters above have weighed in on already. I especially like the kitchen and the “man cave” lower level. That play loft-looking thing in one of the pics is really cool too.

    Overall I’m more pleased with the inside than the outside.




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  • Marcus

    Here is a link to the Virtual Tour with more pictures and a plan for the landscaping and pool.

    http://tour.getmytour.com/public/vtour/display/23831?idx=1




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  • Iemand

    @ Daniel and Grrrowler: Yeah, I can see your points about the piano, but I just love them (even though I don’t play it, unfortunately 🙁 ) There are mechanisms that will play the piano automatically (no I don’t mean an electric (fake) pianos). It’s costly but I would love it.

    @ jd: I have the same feeling. But they have a point, when you’re paying thát much on a house you expect quality aka a good house.

    @ NOVA Ben: If I had an exercise room I would definitely use it; you can go whenever you want. I agree with the wine cellars: most of the wine people use aren’t even made for that; those are supposed to be drunk within a year or so.

    @ Marcus: see, this could turn into a great house.




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    • NOVA Ben

      I just thought of another…saunas. Who the hell actually uses those? I could picture someone having one built in their house, using it once and saying “well that was cool” and never do it again. Once again, I could be wrong here…




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