Here are 4 videos of Rose Terrace, the lavish estate built by Anna Dodge.

Here’s what HOTR reader Barney has to say –

Hey Fellow HOTR Fanatics

Barney from Grosse Pointe Michigan here, with a TRULY magnificent, historical video treat for you guys. ESPECIALLY those of you who might very mistakenly STILL think that all of southeastern Michigan is nothing but one huuuge, extended ghetto from Detroit. Please see below four videos….the first three were from a very well done 1/2 hr. local show, filmed in 1971 on the ONE AND ONLY, irreplaceable Grosse Pointe, lakefront mansion called “Rose Terrace”.  This show was produced after the owner, Anna Dodge, died in 1970, and it will TRULY TAKE YOUR BREATH AWAY, and blow your minds to smithereens.  The fourth vid is a fantastic collection of pics of Rose Terrace, and lists, correctly, all the major and astonishing architectural, construction, design (both interior & exterior) facts and UNBELIEVABLE & priceless masterpieces of art that the chateau was filled with.  I’ve been obsessed with this impeccable estate (which was tragically torn down in 1976) since I was a child (I’m 49 now) and I have a couple of personal connections to it.  I was in it as a kid with my deceased Mom (and don’t, VERY unfortunately remember) and my oldest, deceased Aunt work tirelessly to try & preserve it.  She also created huge, gorgeous flower arrangements for an unforgettable dinner dance, the night before the house was torn down.

FEAST YOUR EYES & EARS, My Friends! I truly cannot wait to read your responses.  And YES, southeastern, metro-Detroit is STILL a very beautiful place to live….EVEN today, & during the worst winter weather.  It’s NOT Palm Beach for sure, but we’re sure as Hell NOT in Chernobyl either folks!   BIG thanks to Kenny for his hospitality in indulging me with this guest post………ENJOY!

  • Mak

    What a coincidence. I saw these videos just last week.

    The place was truly a work of art. What a tragedy that it was destroyed.




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  • Daniel

    The home reminds me off all the great Newport mansions. Sad to see not only this house was destroyed, but her Palm Beach palace as well:

    http://fallentowers.blogspot.com/2010/07/playa-riente-forgotten-masterpiece-of.html

    What happened to the plot of land the house was situated on? Did they put a mini-mall on the land or turn it into a cookie-cutter subdivision?




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    • Barney

      The owners of the land built the most HORRIBLE, mid ’70’s/early 80’s “homes” on the land. Every last one of them are truly pathetic….I know, ’cause I’ve been in a number of them. The ONLY, and I mean ONLY good thing about them is that each one featured a architectural element (whatever that means) from original Rose Terrace. Look up “Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe, Michigan” on Bing Live Earth, once you zero in, go to “Birds’ Eye View”, and you’ll be able to make out the rough size (8 acres) of the original estate. You’ll also be able to see ONE remaining granite & limestone garden wall left from the house….right on one of the postage stamp sized lots of one of the shideous houses built there. Sighhhhhhhhhhhhhh……




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      • Cindy

        Hello Barney, Hope you’re still reading this. I have the entrance gates on my property in Wells County Indiana. My Father bought them in 1976. He had plans of putting them to use at a new location, but his time here ran out. I am now wanting to sell them, if you could give me any ideas on getting the word out to the right folks I certainly would be most happy.
        Thank you, Cindy




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  • Bryson Thomas

    This is the early version of MTV CRIBS ahhaha




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  • Grrrowler

    Thanks for the post and videos. Fascinating information, and it was definitely an amazing house. His brother’s mansion, Meadow Brook Hall, has always been a favorite of mine, and it’s great to get to see some of this house. Shame that it’s not longer standing.




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    • Barney

      Actually Grrrowler……Meadowbrook never was John Dodge’s home. Horace Dodge built the first, HUGE Rose Terrace in about 1915 (or so). After his AND his brother John’s death, both in 1920, they left Anna (Horace’s widow) and Matilda (Johns’ widow) as two of the richest people in the country. Anna then, ’round 1930 or so tore down the original Rose Terrace, and built the second one you see in the videos. Matilda married Alfred Wilson in ’22 or so, and then they built Meadowbrook (80,000 sq. feet…and that’s NOT an estimate!! 124 rooms!)together, and it was completed in 1926. I have more personal connections there, too. I was friends with a guy who was the first librarian to Oakland University (which Matilda started with a HUGE endowment to Michigan State University….which still owns & runs the house today). He lived for years in what is the original Gatekeepers home on Adams Road. He also was the very first tour guide for the mansion, and knew Matilda personally. The gatekeepers house was small (of course) but built to last FOR-EVER. Back then (mid 1980’s) you could still see a good length of the original driveway going through the property to the house……Wonderful!!!




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      • Monica Hosking

        Can we still reach you because I have 4 built in shelves that are hand carved from Rose Terrace- Horace Trumbauer architect and it looks like n the you tube video- I see one on them in the corner of Hugh Dillman’s room at 7:49 in the Rose Terrace- The Anna Dodge Estate – video. Can you give me information on what they are worth. We are downsizing and will not be able to use them. Thanks




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  • Jason

    holy wow! I was under the impression this masterpiece of American architecture was still extant. how sad to find out that one of Horace Trumbauer’s most beautiful creations was destroyed for a number of non-distinct tract homes. if anyone wants to invest $50-75 for Acanthus Press’ Horace Trumbauer monograph, it would be money well spent! there are many, many fabulous mansions within it’s covers (including this one and Lynnewood Hall) detailed in crisp b&w pics and all have floorplans as well. Thw name dropping on these videos only emphasizes the quality and luxury that was amassed to build this home. Apparantly Anna Dodge’s much younger and socially ambitious interior decorator was the one who helped choose her exquisite interior fittings. talk about the perfect “sugar momma”!




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    • Barney

      You KNOW it, Jason! And I’ve read many times (from reputable sources) that Duveen was just as much a scheister (sp?) and (as far as Anna Dodge was concerned) a crook, too. He valued the vast majority of art, furniture, tapestries, lighting, carpets, etc. etc. etc way more than they were really worth, and over charged her BIG time for them……over & over & over. And the book about Trumbauer you mentioned is a really magnificent one. I WISH it was in my budget. And Lynewood Hall is STILL standing in Philadelphia…..did you know that? Google it and you’ll get all the latest info. WHAT wouldn’t we give to be able to go through & see it, IN DETAIL, huh?!




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  • robert

    Enjoyed the videos. Kind of a flashback to the 70’s. Beautiful house and enjoyed learning about all the valuable things she collected for the house. It was an education.




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  • Kyle

    Very nice, although I would have made it where the walls around the big staircase were wood-paneled, I would have had those big columns fluted, not plain, and I would have had coffered ceilings in the dining room, library, and so forth – I really don’t like those plain white ceilings at all, just looks too, well, plain.

    And if all that would be incorrect in terms of the period design (say the period design had wood-paneled walls but white ceilings), then I would just be modifying the period design, that’s how designs evolve over the years anyway 😀




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    • Barney

      Well, you’re right for the most part, Kyle. And while I, personally, would never suggest a changes to certain historic homes that I find perfect, that’s the great thing about free will…..any of us can 🙂 But I see your point about the stair hall & cielings…..they are white and plain. And the stair hall walls come off as quite cold and austere….but again, it’s THE Rose Terrace we’re talkin’ about here…..all that marble, limestone & granite fits it perfectly.




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      • Kyle

        Yeah, I didn’t mean to suggest if say the home was still standing and I purchased it, that I would modify it in that sense. if a home is near period-perfect and one-of-a-kind and built with that kind of craftsmanship that is near impossible to find anymore, I think it best to leave it that way.

        I just meant if I was custom-building the home from scratch and they showed me pictures of what the rooms would look like, I’d modify it 😀




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  • LE

    Nice work. Horace Trumbauer was well known for designs for the ubber wealthy in the early 1900’s. He also designed homes in Newport, RI and along the Philly main Line such as these estates:

    Whitemarsh hall: http://www.serianni.com/wh0.htm

    Lynnewood mansion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZkP4Fsmatg

    Although Whitemarsh hall was torn down, Lynnewood is somehow still standing even though it’s been empty for many years.

    Enjoy…




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    • Barney

      Thanks for that, LE…..fantastic links, and I’m insane for the vast majroity of Trumbauers work. But do you know if Lynewood Hall is actually vacant, or is that whatever-church of whatever still in it/owning it? I’ve read repeatedly that (if I’ve got it right) that some type of Asian denomination has owned it for years, and that (of course, VERY unfortunately) they’ve let it go to Hell (big surprised) with serious neglect? Any update you have would be greatly appreciated.




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  • Brijbhushan Bhattadri

    Beautiful and sad videos. I’ll never understand the logic behind tearing such magnificent architecture down. Thanks, Barney and Kenny!

    As far as Lynnewood Hall is concerned, doesn’t M Cal of Pricey Pads have his own group dedicated to its preservation? Good to see you gentlemen working to keep memories of these grand homes alive and to preserve those that are in danger. Thank you for this!




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  • zach

    We can take a little consolation for its loss by the existence in Newport, RI of Miramar, the former Widener estate, which is an almost exact duplicate of Rose Terrace, only slightly smaller. Google Miramar Newport RI images for some pictures and links.
    Zach




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    • Barney

      VERY true and astute of you, Zach….I was gonna’ announce that, but hadn’t gotten around to it yet, obviously. Wanna’ hear something about Miramar that’s amazing? I used to be in real estate here in Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, and SOMEHOW, I found out that Miramar was up for sale, about 4 or 5 years ago. I spoke with the agent at length, and about my knowledge of it’s “sister” mansion, Rose Terrace. He was thoughtful & kind enough to mail to me a large, full color, glossy photo brochure of the house, plus one or two other promo pieces on it being for sale. I’ve got it buried here in the basement somewhere, so now I HAVE TO dig it up, scan the brochure as best I can, and post all the pics here on HOTR. Great connection, huh?




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  • Raven

    When you see estates like Rose Terrace or Whitemarsh, you understand that mansions in Beverly Hills are mostly very bad…




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    • Barney

      AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMEN!




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  • Charlie

    Did they really tear that mansion down? That’s outrageous.




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  • Kieran

    Love these vids




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  • Oliver

    so sad 🙁




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  • Derrick

    I love that Anna Dodge’s Rose Terrace II ( the original Rose Terrace was demolished by Anna and stood on part of the subsequent estate) so outshines her former sister-in-law’s rival mansion Meadowbrook Hall–built by Matilda Dodge Wilson. Sadly Meadowbrook Hall is still standing ( and is open for tours) when Rose Terrace is the estate that SHOULD have been preserved.




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  • Edsel Ford

    Tradgic that it (Roseterrace) was demolished, thank God The “Cotswalds” Estate is still there.




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  • Susan

    I just found the video of Rose Terrace and the beauty of the mansion and grounds took my breath away. I know it is expensive to maintain these works of art but they do it in other countries. You would think someone with some bucks and brains would form a foundation to save these beautiful old properties. Most people think you have to go to Europe to see great homes. We have them right here and no one will ever know when they are all gone. Our young people have no idea what beautiful architecture both building and grounds are right here in the United States, and if any are still standing need help to remain. When I read in this sight that Rose Terrace had been torn down I felt sick. I didn’t know about it until this day, how sad. One more petle on the flower gone for ever. Lets hope someday there will be other great homes like this built again, by people with wonderful imaginations and forsight for such beauty.




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  • nancy

    Greetings,

    I purchased a 9 foot bronze fountian which I understand was at the Dodge Estate……..does anyone have any information about it?




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    • Rose Terrace

      Nancy do you have a photo? I might have something on my end the could confirm where it was – inside or out???




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    • Rose Terrace

      Nancy you can reach me thru the Rose Terrace YouTube videos.




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      • Monica Hosking

        I have 4 built in shelves that are hand carved from Rose Terrace- Horace Trumbauer architect and it looks like n the you tube video- I see one on them in the corner of Hugh Dillman’s room at 7:49 in the Rose Terrace- The Anna Dodge Estate – video. Can you give me information on what they are worth. We are downsizing and will not be able to use them. Thanks




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        • Monica Hosking

          They are in beautiful shape. 2 are about 14 feet tall and the other two are about 10-12- not sure right now. They build into the all.




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  • T.Miller

    I knew Rose Terrace quite well in fact. The YouTube 3 part video brought tears to my eyes. It was 1974 when I 1st walked throught the great halls, and into an empty palace. What a treat for a 14 year old- playing the great organ (not well at all) and spending 3 hours in an emply shell. I remember the “lift” with the oriental panels of silk stitching, seeing the most amazing bathrooms, tub and showers that could best be thought of as a mini car-wash, the paneling, etc, etc.
    My father, Thomas Sr. and his friend, Don Renchler were the ones that looked at the grand palace as a money making scheam, having no thought for the history they were to benifit (financially) from.

    To the person (s) that posted this, I give all my thanks. I have a picture of myself outside the front enterance. I’d like to share it, if someone might like to see it.

    Although Grosse Pointe is no longer the city I knew as a child, I will always remembermy Grampa Jacobson taking me to Alfred Glancy’s christmas party’s, or to the point, for a 6 year old boy,being treated in his basement, playing with the most amazing toy train set imaginable, to Rose Terrace and the other great places that made Grosse Pointe: many of us will continue to remember our beloved city, and with sites like this, we won’t forget out great city!




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