A penthouse at London’s prestigious One Hyde Park development has sold for a record breaking £140 million or $220 million. It was originally valued at £100 million. The buyer’s identity remains a secret. The six-bedrooom apartment, which has been on the market for quite some time, stretches across two floors and boasts bullet-proof windows, a panic room and views across the Serpentine. The sale price makes it the most expensive property in Britain, surpassing the £115 million ($180 million) paid for a flat at the exclusive 8 St James’s Square development in Westminster in 2008. The One Hyde Park development boasts 86 properties starting at around £20 million ($31.3 million), and is the brainchild of luxury property developers Christian and Nick Candy. I could never imagine spending that much money on a penthouse, let alone a detached home.

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  • Barney

    THE INMATES ARE RUNNING THE ASYLUM!!!!!

    When I first read this, Kenny, I WAS ABSOLUTELY SURE that you had your currency amounts HUGELY WRONG. I though “Nnnnnnnnnnnnnaaaawww, there’s not way on EARTH that those numbers are right!!” So I went to a conversion chart, and plugged in the amounts, and YOU ARE RIGHT, KENNY.

    This sale literally & completely INCINERATES ANY & ALL SANITY to a TOTAL CRISP. That ANYone would PRICE a residential space for SALE at THAT AMOUNT (or whatever it originally was), and MUCH LESS, that ANYONE would ACTUALLY PAY TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY-MILLION (American Dollars) is ETERNALLY PSYCHOTIC, plain and simple. But, then again, we’re talkin’ about the human race, who is all too often just that, so I guess………….




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    • Marie

      Barney, I couldn’t agree more $200 million dollars??? ugh




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  • Daniel

    This is ridiculous. Money to burn? The moon is probably cheaper.

    For those that care to see where the Candy brothers live, check out this:

    architecturaldigest.com/homes/homes/2009/11/view_from_the_top_article

    Who on earth would pay that much to share walls with other people? Kensington Palace Gardens is the only place I can think of in England that MIGHT command a price that high.




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    • Barney

      Dan, and EVERYONE ELSE………I ORDER YOU ALL to go to candandcandy.com, which is the Candy brothers website, and be prepared for MULTIPLE visual ORGASMS of BREATHTAKINGLY STUNNING interiors from many of their projects, including Hyde Park, their yacht(S), and others.

      So many of all the properties are LITERALLY SO BEAUTIFUL, and IMPECCABLY DONE that they’ll make you NAUSEOUS WITH ENVY & LUST……I AM!

      I DO NOT exaggerate!!! Lemme’ know what you think by posting your opinions here, guys.




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      • Daniel

        Oh I saw alright. They are incredibly tasteful and so rich looking. Nothing cheap anywhere. BUT, I don’t care how gorgeous those interiors are, this apartment is not worth $220 million+. Their apartment in Monaco I could see selling for that price, just because it is an 18,000 square-foot double penthouse in Monaco in a world-famous building, but not this.




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        • Barney

          You couldn’t be more right about the utterly heart-stopping beauty of their work Daniel, but you’re OH SO WRONG about Hyde Park and their penthouse in Monaco…………ABSOLUTELY NO SINGLE HOME ON EARTH MADE BY THE HAND OF MAN ON THIS ENTIRE PLANET is worth ANYWHERE NEAR THAT!!!!!!!

          I TANDEM WRETCH with both DISGUST & LUST at those prices and the beauty of their work……talk about SCHIZOPHRENIC!!! Somebody get a Doctor! LOL




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          • Daniel

            Well, let’s just say if I had billions of dollars to blow on a residence, I would choose their Monaco penthouse over the London penthouse. I need an ocean view!

            And I sadly have to disagree with you that no home is worth anywhere near that. Not saying a lot of homes are worth that (maybe a handful in the entire world), but I can think of two:

            1) Ira Rennert’s compound in Sagaponnack. I personally don’t like the house because I wouldn’t want to spend 20 minutes going through courtyards and courtyards to get from one side of the house to the other.
            2) Sydell Miller’s home in Palm Beach. Dream house. Wouldn’t change a thing. 84,000 square feet of absolute opulence. Definitely a contender for $150 million+ price tag.
            (newyorksocialdiary.com/node/212627)

            Personally, I’d feel guilty writing out a check for a home with a 9-figure price tag when there are so many people I could help while still being perfectly content with a home a quarter of the price. Sadly, people have more money than sense.

            ****BUT****, there are worse things you could but, such as spending $100 million+ on a Giacometti statue or a Picasso. Absolutely useless in my opinion.




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          • Stewie

            Actually Daniel in my opinion a rare Picasso is far more likely to appreciate in value over time than this apartment (which I don’t find that spectacular). I would go for the painting. Great paintings are great investments for the rich; rich people have been investing in art for thousands of years and they will still be doing it in thousands of years. Paintings by the most renowned of artists will always do well. Will this apartment stand the test of time? Hmmm. Not everyone is as mad as an oil rich arab who has never worked in his life. The real quesiton is, is anyone going to pay MORE than $220 million in a few years time for this? If the answer is yes then it’s been an ok investment. But if the answer is no (which I suspect) this guy (Emir of Quatar) has just lit up some more petrodollars. One thing I am pretty sure of is that a Western billionaire is extremely unlikely to pay anything near that for that apartment. It could well sell for 70 million less in a few years meaning a huge loss




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          • Daniel

            (This comment is in response to Stewie)

            As an investment standpoint, I agree with you. Real Estate is certainly more volatile than fine art. However, if I had billions of dollars, I would tend to spend more on items that are of physical use to me: Homes, yachts, planes, and my vice, classic cars. These are things I probably would go overboard on (for example: my dream garage would need a minimum capacity of 40 automobiles; I could honestly fill every bay). Art is not my forte however, and as awe-inspiring as some of it may be, I would NEVER pay for something so inanimate, so lifeless, so static. I’d rather loose money on cars/homes/yachts, but at least I would have fun using them or entertaining on/in them. That’s just me…




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          • Kyle

            Much “fine art” isn’t worth much either, it is just people are stupid enough to pay such massive prices for what are oftentimes hideous things. I remember a painting of some obscure very ugly person sold for something like $40 million.




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      • Kenny Forder

        WOW!!! They have done some beautiful work!




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        • Barney

          Beautiful doesn’t even begin to describe it Kenny! That’s like saying George Bush was a just a LITTLE stupid!

          Their work deserves a whole new group of English adjectives invented to describe it. CAN YOU IMAGINE hitting the lotto, then having their firm design & decorate your dream home and then inviting your family & friends over?!?!
          You’d have to remind EVERYone to close their mouths from astonishment, over & over, and you’d probably have to have ’em forcibly removed…….’cause who’d blame ’em for NOT EVER wanting to leave?? Not me!




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          • Kenny Forder

            haha, you’re right. Oh, I could only imagine! When I’m rich, I’m MOST DEFINITELY hiring them to design and decorate the interior of my home. Then I’ll invite you and the rest of the Homes of the Rich readers over to bask in its glory =)




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          • Kyle

            Please don’t bring politics on the board; I for one do not think Bush was stupid and if anything was one of our better presidents in many ways.




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      • Venom

        Really not that impressed.
        Highly edited photos and there was definitely not hundreds of millions of dollars worth of detail work, that is for sure.

        They are like a Ferrari Scuderia, give you a lot less and charge you a whole lot more.
        I never subscribed to that suckers school of thought.




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        • Barney

          ?!?! Venom! I’m surprised!……….”Suckers”…..really?! 🙁

          While I agree with you that the sale price for this place is certifiably and ragingly insane, you don’t think that the quality, finishes, materials, executions, placements, colors, and all else of the Candy Brothers firm isn’t exquisite??

          Amazing how on some things we can agree but categorically & intractably DISagree on this! I cannot comprehend how anyone would not, at least, think their work attractive, when it’s truly stunning.




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      • David Thompson

        Their style seems very stiff and formal. I don’t think I would like to live or work in one of their projects. It might be nice to visit, but if anyone was with me I would feel very uncomfortable.




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  • Onions

    Bullet proof glass for the penthouse. Nice….because you never know when somebody’s gonna drop in with a helicopter like on Godfather 3.




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    • Stewie

      Onions, this project was specifically made for people who make their money from a more dubious background. If you’re a prince of an oil rich state and are spending $220 million of your countries money on yourself instead of on the people , then there’s bound to be some very pissed off people. Basically, these dictatorial royal families from oil rich states are a complete disgrace to the countries they lead and I am very surprised that a wide-scale revolution in countries where this type of behaviour occurs has not happened yet




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  • sebastian

    Maybe the reason for bullet proof glass is probably for in case of a crime increase. For safety.




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    • Onions

      obviously it’s for safety. but how often do bullets get fired at penthouses?




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  • Nalin

    so…. does he have to pay condo fees every month on top of the $200,000,000 price?




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  • Joe

    Wow that’s crazy. It doesn’t even look that nice to me.. And what’s a panic room?




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    • Daniel

      A room Jodie Foster and her diabetic daughter Kristin Stewart use to hide from Forest Whitaker.

      mypanicroom.com/images/panic-room.jpg




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  • Stewie

    Utterly ridiculous. It must be an Arab. The thing about Arabs is that there is obviously a lot of oil in some middle eastern countries and most of them are dictatorships, i.e. absolute monarchies. So basically all of the revenue of the oil is controlled by royal families and their thousands of prince offspring. I heard the Emir of Quatar bought this, but I could be wrong. Basically, imagine the entire US belonged to 1 major royal family who controls everything; the money, the politics, the laws, everything. If an Indian or a Russian bought it I would actually be surprised, because they have made their money themselves and so I would imagine be a little more cautious spending it – especially now, after much of their wealth has dropped during the financial crises. But you never know. There are hundreds of Europeans who are billionaires too, Germany alone has around 50. Yet you never hear Western Europeans paying these prices; it’s always foreigners (ie mostly Arabs). America has the most billionaires in the world by far, at one point 3 years ago we had 80% of the world’s billionaires, it might be a little less now but it’s probably still over 50%. Americans may like luxury but we’re not that stupid. Only people who made their money extremely quickly through either a) the privatisation of previously state owned property (the switch from communism to capitalism or b) belong to a dictatorial regieme in an oil rich state where their family has absolute control, would make such a purchase. Completely and totally absurd and basically shows that some people really have more money than sense. But hey, this is good news for the West I guess. Let arabs spend their money here instead of their own country




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    • Onions

      agreed 100%. i love how most of the world complains about the American megalomaniac attitudes. most our billionaires are philanthropists while the billionaires in 3rd world countries are spending $$ like the sultan of brunei.




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      • Stewie

        True that. 40 US Billionaires have signed the Giving Pledge, which means that at least 50% of their net worth will go to charity. America has always had the greatest capitalist philanthropists, this goes all the way back to John D Rockefeller and Andrew Carnagie and even earlier. In America people MAKE money, and then once they’ve got enough, they give it away to charitable causes. In the Middle East royals simply TAKE money (from oil revenues that actually belong to the entire country and population), and spend it on themselves. I’d really like to know how many Arabs are rich who are NOT royals or extended family members thereof from an oil rich dictatorship state. Very, very few. These people will be back riding camels when the oil runs out.
        Stories like this really make me think that it’s high time the US and the West became more energy independent. We have the technology, we have the brains, surely there’s a different way to power our cars and airplanes than through a substance won in the most corrupt and lawless lands in the world (Saudi Arabia speaks for itself – the worlds worst and most oppressive dictatorship.) If US Presidents weren’t such cowards they would finally stand up to these tyrants and tell them to f off – it would make our homeland a hell of a lot safer, more environmentally friendly, and truly independent from such dubious and shady countries. I really do hate Saudi Arabia and the fact that we have become so co-operative with an evil dictatorship country that does not even follow the most basic human rights; that stones people and hacks off their heads for the pettiest of crimes, that bans the practice of every religion except for islam, where leaving islam is punishable by death, that funds radical mosques throughout the West (particularly in Europe) and that puts women into a really unthinkable category of subordination (they are not even allowed to drive or speak to men). A true stone age country with the most disgusting of practices.




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        • Barney

          VERY well said, Stewie…..I could NOT possibly agree with you more.

          However, the more I mature (I’m 49) it seems more & more inevitable that the vast majority of the human race is LESS likely to change for the better, rather than MORE, VERY VERY VERY unfortunately.

          Trying to reconcile what absolutely seems to be inescapable reality to me gets harder & harder everyday…………….




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        • Onions
          • Kyle

            Well the problem with alternative energy is we don’t have the technology in fact. As it currently stands, there is simply no viable replacement for oil, coal, natural gas, etc…as energy sources. They also are not just used for energy, they are used for making things as well, like plastics, tires, laundry detergent, etc…all need petroleum.

            We could use plants to replace a lot of the petroleum (plant-based hydrocarbons), but there is no way to mass-produce the plants that would be needed.

            We could drill for more oil domestically, but that isn’t too popular either right now, especially with what just happened, which if the extreme environmentalists have their way, will make the Gulf Oil Spill the Three Mile Island of the oil drilling industry.

            The moratorium on oil drilling also may make more drilling rigs leave the country permanentely, and this may make us more dependent on states like the Saudis.




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  • Kyle

    IMO the architecture of this place is hideous and an eyesore. I would bet that the only person who bought this is some oil shiehk or whatnot for whom money literally is to them like the air that we breath (i.e. you don’t value it much).

    The Sultan of Brunei, for example, owns something like hundreds of cars. Thing is, not exquisite one-of-a-kinds, just literally hundreds of cars, most of which collect dust sitting around. It’s like they just burn money for fun. I bet it was one of those types that bought this place.

    The Candy Brothers designs work looks very nice for that particular style (contemporary), but otherwise, nothing special IMO, and the architecture, forget it.




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  • K.G.

    $200M for a flat in London? Shocking! New owner is probably some guy who made money the easy way. He could have bought Updown court instead. And why o why in London? Extremely overcrowed, no greenery, no sea viw etc. Updown Court on the other hand is in the suburbs. Much more private and much more classical. Lots of gardens and trees. This flat is simply not worth the money.




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  • Jason

    did anyone catch the renderings and floorplans for a 20 thousand sq ft. plus house on the CandyandCandy website? it’s quite nice. No way is this apartment worth $200 million, but I’d rather live in One Hyde Park than Updown Court. that house is a monstrosity of architecture. sorry guys, just because its’ big and expensive doesn’t make it significant. John B. Scholz is a McMansion architect who wouldn’t know classicism if it hit him on the head. see for yourself- http://www.scholz.us/




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    • Daniel

      I agree with you. Given the choice, regardless of the price on the tag, I would have to go with the London penthouse. Updown Court is quite ugly and doesn’t know what it wants to be (French, English, Neoclassical, Moroccan even!). And it’s so damn cold looking. As quaint as the English countryside may be, I would never want to make it my 2nd, 3rd or even 4th home. Updown Court should have been half the size with double the details in my opinion. Ocean view or City view please.




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  • Root

    this property at USD.220Mil is bought by some corrupt minister from Pakistan. this news is published here today in news paper. what a joke , people are dying with flood and corrupt people are spending money like a tissue paper.




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  • Wael Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    money talk enjoy it we got it thanks GOD thats all ok .




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